CPC National Collection Plant Profile

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Viburnum dentatum var. venosum


Family: 
Caprifoliaceae  
Common Name: 
Southern arrowwood
Author: 
(Britt.) Gleason
Growth Habit: 
Tree, Shrub
CPC Number: 
8516

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Viburnum dentatum var. venosum is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 

 
Viburnum dentatum var. venosum


The southern arrowwood is a native shrub that grows from 3 to 9 feet tall. Its leaves are deciduous, opposite, simple, and oval-shaped with coarsely but regularly toothed margins. These shiny green leaves turn yellow to reddish-purple in the late fall. Flowers bloom in May and early June, and are small and white, occurring in 2 to 4-inch flat-topped clusters. From August to November bluish-black berries can be found on the tree. These berries are attractive to wildlife. Because of these qualities, the species Viburnum dentatum is widely-used horticulturally in the central and eastern United States. (USDA 2002a)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Delaware
Maryland
Massachusetts
New Jersey
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Virginia
State Range of  Viburnum dentatum var. venosum
Habitat
  Found in open woods and wood margins and along stream banks, preferring loamy soil with ample moisture. (USDA 2002a; Kartesz 1999)

Distribution
  According to Kartesz (1999):
Delaware (Present)
Massachusetts (Present)
Maryland (Present)
New Jersey (Rare)
New York (Rare)
Ohio (Present)
Pennsylvania (Present)
Rhode Island (Present)
Virginia (Present)

Number Left
  Unknown.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G5T4T5
 
6/7/1999
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
 
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  New York S2 U 2/9/1990  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  The fruit of this taxon is attractive to wildlife. (USDA 2002a)
This species has potential disease problems when used horticulturally, and possibly in its native habitat (USDA 2002a).

Threats
  Habitat loss.

Current Research Summary
  Meyer and Witmer (1998) studied the influence of seed processing by frugivorous birds on the germination success three shrubs, including Viburnum dentatum.

Current Management Summary
  None known.

Research Management Needs
  Very little is known about how this taxon interacts with its native environment.
Determine true distribution, population sizes and health of the variety venosum.

Ex Situ Needs
  Maintain a genetically representative seed bank.

References

Journal Articles

Chong, C.; Hamersma, B.; Bellamy, K.L. 1998. Comparative rooting of deciduous landscape shrub cuttings in media amended with paper mill biosolids from four different sources. Canadian Journal of Plant Science. 78, 4: 519-526.

Evans, M.R.; Iles, J.K. 1997. Growth of Viburnum dentatum and Syringa X prestoniae 'Donald Wyman' in Sphagnum peat and coir dust-based substrates. Journal of Environmental Horticulture. 15, 3: 156-9.

Fleischer, A.B.; Stonecipher, M.; Kron, K.A.; Jaffe, M.J. 1994. Microscopic Artifact Found During Examination of the Skin-Plant Hair of Viburnum dentatum. Cutis. 54, 1: 37-39.

Larson, R.A. 2000. Field Notes: Viburnum dentatum var. deamii. American Nurseryman. 192, 1: 126.

Meyer, G.A.; Witmer, M.C. 1998. Influence of seed processing by frugivorous birds on germination success of three North American shrubs. American Midland Naturalist. 140, 1: 129-139.

Milberg, P. 1997. Weed seed germination after short-term light exposure: germination rate, photon fluence response and interaction with nitrate. Weed Research. 37, 3: 157-164.

Ortiz-Pulido, R.; Rico-Gray, V. 2000. The effect of spatio-temporal variation in understanding the fruit crop size hypothesis. Oikos. 91, 3: 523-527.

Sargent, S. 1990. Neighborhood Effects on Fruit Removal by Birds: a Field Experiment with Viburnum dentatum (Caprifoliaceae). Ecology. 71, 4: 1289-1298.

Stover, M.E.; Marks, P.L. 1998. Successional vegetation on abandoned cultivated and pastured land in Tompkins County, New York. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 125, 2: 150-164.

Reports

USDA. 2002. Plant Fact Sheets. United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Northeast Plant Materials Program. p.2.

USDA. 2002. Plant Guides. Contributed By: USDA, NRCS, National Plant Data Center & the Biota of North America Program. p.3.

Theses

Parris, Robert Warren. 1986. Forest vegetation, earthworm (Lumbricidae), and woodcock (Scolopax minor) relationships (New York). [Ph.D. Thesis]: State University of New York. 255p.

Verkade, Stephen Dunning. 1985. Effects of endomycorrhizal inoculation on growth of selected landscape plants during nursery production. [Ph.D. Thesis]: Purdue University. 76p.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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