CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Boltonia decurrens

Photographer:
Casey Galvin

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Boltonia decurrens


Family: 
Asteraceae  
Common Names: 
claspingleaf doll's daisy, Decurrent false aster
Author: 
(Torr. & Gray) Wood
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
8090

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Boltonia decurrensenlarge
Photographer: Casey Galvin


Boltonia decurrens is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Kimberlie McCue, Ph.D. contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Boltonia decurrens


Endemic to Illinois and central eastern Missouri, Boltonia decurrens is one of the rarest native species in this region. In fact, until two Missouri Botanical Garden botanists rediscovered it north of St. Louis in 1986, the Decurrent false aster was thought to have been extirpated from Missouri.
The species grows in open muddy bottomlands and is dependent upon disturbance from cyclical flooding to maintain the habitat suitable for its survival (USFWS 1990).

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Illinois
Missouri
State Range of  Boltonia decurrens
Habitat
  Historically, this species was found on the shores of lakes and the banks of streams including the Illinois River (USFWS 1990). Today, it is most common in disturbed lowland areas where human-caused disturbance provides adequate habitat (Hickey 1988; USFWS 1988, 1990).

Commonly found with Acer saccharum, Populus deltoides, Salix nigra, Platanus occidentalis, Cornus racemosa (USFWS 1990).

Distribution
  Along the Illinois River in west central Illinois and along the Mississippi near St. Louis, primarily on the Illinois side.

Number Left
  The number of sites with above ground plants varies from year to year. The majority of sites are in Illinois, only one, possibly two, are extant in Missouri (USFWS 1990). In some years some sites have been reported to have hundreds of thousands of individuals.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G2
 
8/9/1995
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LT
 
11/14/1988
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
Yes
 
9/28/1990

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Illinois LT 1/1/2002  
  Missouri S1 E 7/16/2001  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Field observations and laboratory studies in Dr. Marian Smith's lab suggest that seeds disperse via floodwaters from established populations to new sites that meet this species' environmental requirements for seedling establishment. (Smith 2002)

Threats
  Threats include destruction and modification of floodplain habitat, agricultural expansion, flood control and blockage of seed germination by excess siltation (USFWS 1990).

Current Research Summary
  Extensive research has been done and continues to be done by Dr. Marian Smith's Plant Physiological Ecology Laboratory in Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville (Smith and Keevin 1998, Smith and Mettler 2001).

Current Management Summary
  There is no centralized management plan.

Research Management Needs
  The potential of disking as a management strategy is being investigated. Research needs include understanding reproduction biology and ecology, seedling recruitment and habitat requirements.

Ex Situ Needs
  Develop and maintain public support for the species

References

Books (Single Authors)

2000. Missouri Plants of Conservation Concern. Jefferson City, MO: Conservation Commission of Missouri--Missouri Department of Conservation.

Herkert, J.; Ebinger, J.E. 2002. Endangered and threatened species of Illinois: Status and distribution. Springfield, IL: Illinois Endangered Species Protection Board. 161p.

Books (Sections)

Smith, M.; Mettler, P. 2001. The role of the flood pulse in maintaining Boltonia decurrens, a fugitive plant species of the Illinois River floodplain: A case history of a threatened species. In: Middleton, B.S., editor. Flood Pulsing and Wetland Restoration in North American. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. New York, NY.

Electronic Sources

Smith, M. (2002). Boltonia decurrens Research Station. Southern Illinois University Edwardsville at Edwardsville, Illinois. http://www.siue.edu/~msmith/reproduction.htm. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Baskin, C.C.; Baskin, J.M. 2002. Achene germination ecology of the federally threatened floodplain endemic Boltonia decurrens (Asteraceae). American Midland Naturalist. 147: 16-24.

Junk, W.J.; Piedade, M.T.F. 1993. Biomass and primary-production of herbaceous plant communities in the Amazon floodplain. Hydrobiologia. 263, 3: 155-162.

McClain. W.E.; McClain, R.D.; Ebinger, J.E. 1997. Flora of temporary sand ponds in Cass and Mason Counties, Illinois. Castanea. 62, 2: 65-73.

Schwegman, J.; Nyboer, R.W. 1985. The Taxonomic and Population Status of Boltonia decurrens (Torr & Gray) Wood. Castanea. 50, 2: 112-115.

Schwegman, J.E. 1988. Illinoensis. Newsletter of the Illinois Native Plant Conservation Program. 4, 1: 4?.

Smith, M.; Brandt, T.; Stone, J. 1995. Effect of soil texture and microtopography on germination and seedling growth on Boltonia decurrens (Asteraceae), a threatened floodplain species. Wetlands: The Journal of the Society of the Wetlands. 15, 4: 392.

Smith, M.; Caswell, H.; Mettler-Cherry, P. 2005. Stochastic flood and precipitation regimes and the population dynamics of a threatened floodplain plant. Ecology. 15, 3: 1036-1052.

Smith, M.; Cawly, J. 2002. Effect of achene morphology and mass on germination and seedling growth of Boltonia decurrens (Asteraceae), a threatened floodplain species. Rhodora. 104, 917: 1-13.

Smith, M.; Keevin, T.M. 1998. Achene morphology, production and germination, and potential for water dispersal in Boltonia decurrens (decurrent false aster), a threatened floodplain species. Rhodora. 100, 901: 69-81.

Smith, M.; Kevin, T.; Barkau, R. 1998. Effect of the Flood of 1993 on Boltonia decurrens, a Rare Floodplain Species. Regulated Rivers. 14, 2: 191.

Smith, M.; Moss, J.S. 1998. An Experimental Investigation, using Stomatal Conductance and Fluorescence, of the Flood Sensitivity of Boltonia decurrens and its Competitors. The Journal of Applied Ecology. 35, 4: 553.

Smith, M.; Wu, Y.; Green, O. 1993. Effect of light and water-stress on photosynthesis and biomass production in Boltonia decurrens (Asteraceae), a threatened species. American Journal of Botany. 80, 8: 859.

Stoecker, M.A.; Smith, M.; Melton, E.D. 1995. Survival and Aerenchyma Development under Flooded Conditions of Boltonia decurrens, a Threatened Floodplain Species and Conyza canadensis, a Widely Distributed Competitor. The American Midland Naturalist. 134, 1: 117.

USFWS. 1988. Determination of Threatened Status for Boltonia decurrens (Decurrent False Aster). Federal Register. 53, 219: 45858-45861.

USFWS. 1988. Loss of Wetlands Threatens Four Plants. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 13, 3: 3-5.

Magazine Articles

Rogers, G. 1988. Native Plants. Missouri Native Plant Society: 5. 1. 1-2.

Reports

Hickey, E.E. 1988. A four county survey for Boltonia decurrens (Torr and Gray) Wood (False Starwort). Report prepared by the Missouri Department of Conservation Under Order No. 30181-01589 for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. p.40.

Morgan, S.W. 1980. Status report on Boltonia asteroides var. decurrens in Missouri. Unpublished report, Missouri Department of Conservation. p.13.

Smith, M. 1991. Life history research for the Decurrent False Aster. Springfield, IL: Report to the Illinois Department of Conservation. p.26.

USFWS. 1990. Decurrent False Aster Recovery Plan. Twin Cities, Minnesota: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. p.26.

Theses

Moss, J.K. 1996. Stage-based demography of Boltonia decurrens, a threatened floodplain species. [M.S. Thesis]: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. Edwardsville, IL. 25p.

Redmond, A. 1993. Population study of Boltonia decurrens, a federally threatened plant species. [M.S. Thesis]: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. Edwardsville, IL. 49p.


  This profile was updated on 9/28/2010
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