CPC National Collection Plant Profile

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Allium munzii


Family: 
Liliaceae  
Common Name: 
Munz's onion
Author: 
(Ownbey & Aase) McNeal
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
75

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Allium munzii is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 

 
Allium munzii


This elusive wetland perennial is hard to find. Despite producing 10 to 36 white flowers at a time, it only flowers during years with adequate rainfall, an event which doesn't always happen in Southern California. In fact, this species doesn't even produce leaves during the worst drought years, biding its time until it receives enough rain to grow. This makes it a very difficult plant to study, which is evident from the lack of information on the species. Censusing this plant can only properly be done during good growing years which makes conserving this plant a real challenge. However, this plant, like many wetland species, is at high risk of extinction. Wetlands are quickly disappearing from the American landscape along with those species endemic to them.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  California
State Range of  Allium munzii
Habitat
  Occurs in vernal pools and other wetlands, or on clay soils and moist grasslands generally on shallow slopes and is associated with Alo, Altamont, Bosanko, or Auld soils (USFWS 1998)

This species is typically found in association with southern needle grass grassland, mixed grassland, and grassy openings in coastal sage scrub. It is only occasionally found in cismontane juniper woodlands with at least one specimen found associated with Stipa pulchra, Avena barbata, with a few Juniperus californica. (USFWS 1998)

Distribution
  Mesic clay soils in western Riverside County, California (USFWS 1998)

Number Left
  13 populations in Western Riverside County CA, including the Gavilan Hills, Harford Springs County Park, Paloma Valley, Skunk Hollow, Domenigoni Hills, Bachelor Mountain and the Elsinore Mountains. It is estimated that the total number of plants is somewhere between 20,000 to 70,000 individuals. (USFWS 1998)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G1
 
5/5/2009
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LE
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  California S1.1 2  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Unknown.

Threats
  • Development (both urban and agricultural)
• Clay mining
• Dryland farming activities
• Non-native grasses
• Off-road vehicles
• Fire suppression actions (i.e.. bulldozing and disking)
• Grazing by cattle and sheep
(USFWS 1998)

Current Research Summary
  None known.

Current Management Summary
  A few of the known populations occur on land managed by the Reserve Management Committees for the Riverside County multispecies plans, but a number of others occur on private lands with no management. One population occurs on Federal land. (USFWS 1998)

Research Management Needs
  • Basic biology
• An inventory of all populations
• Surveys of potential habitat

Ex Situ Needs
  • Maintain genetically representative seed bank.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Fiedler, P.L. 1996. Rare Lilies of California. Sacramento, California: California Native Plant Society Press. 154p.

Smith, J.P.; Berg, K. 1988. California native plant society's inventory of rare and endangered vascular plants of California. Sacramento: California Native Plant Society. 168p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Books (Edited Volumes)

James C. Hickman, Editor. 1993 The Jepson manual: Higher plants of California. Berkeley: University of California Press. 1400p.

Electronic Sources

(2000). CalFlora: on California plants for education, research and conservation. [web application]. Berkeley, California: The CalFlora Database [a non-profit organization]. http://www.calflora.org/.. Accessed: 2002.

CDFG. (2002). California's Plants and Animals, Threatened and Endangered Plants. List and Species Accounts. California Department of Fish and Game, Habitat Conservation Planning Branch. http://www.dfg.ca.gov/hcpb/species/t_e_spp/teplant/teplanta.shtml. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

McNeal, D. 1992. A revision of the Allium fimbriatum (Alliaceae) complex. Aliso. 13: 411-426.

USFWS. 1994. Proposed rule to list four southwestern California plants as endangered or threatened. Federal Register. 59, 240: 64812-64823.

USFWS. 1995. Listing Proposals: Eight California Plants. Endangered Species Bulletin. 20, 2: 20.

USFWS. 1995. Notice of Public Hearing and Reopening of Public Comment Period on Proposed Endangered or Threatened Status for Four Southwestern California Plants. Federal Register. 60, 44: 12531-12532.

USFWS. 1998. Determination of endangered or threatened status for four southwestern California plants from vernal wetlands and clay soils. Federal Register. 63, 197: 54975-54994.

Reports

Dudek & Associates, Inc. 1999. Western Riverside County Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) (Riverside County Integrated Plan (RCIP)) ôDraft Proposalö. Riverside, CA: County of Riverside Transportation and Land Management Agency. p.165. Draft Proposal.

KEA Environmental, Inc. 2001. Biological Resources Technical Report for the Valley Rainbow Interconnect. San Diego, CA: San Diego Gas & Electric Company.

Sanguamphai. 1989. 1988 Annual Report on the Status of California's State Listed Threatened and Endangered Plants and Animals. State of California, Department of Fish and Game.

Stephenson, John R.; Calcarone, Gena M. 1999. Southern California Mountains and Foothills Assessment: Habitat and Species Conservation Issues. Chapter 5 - Potentially Vulnerable Species: Plants. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. p.402. General Technical report PSW-GTR-172.


  This profile was updated on 9/28/2010
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