CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Solidago houghtonii

Photographer:
Unknown

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Solidago houghtonii


Family: 
Asteraceae  
Common Name: 
Houghton's goldenrod
Author: 
Torr. & Gray
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
4043

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Solidago houghtoniienlarge
Photographer: Unknown

Solidago houghtoniienlarge
Photographer: Unknown


Solidago houghtonii is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Dawn M. Gerlica and Lindsey Parsons contributed to this Plant Profile.
The initial writing of this profile was funded by the U.S. Forest Service

 
Solidago houghtonii


Solidago houghtonii is often accepted as a distinctive species, but its origins continue to be clouded. It is usually a hexaploid and thought to be a naturally occurring hybrid, but the actual parents are the source of controversy. Potential parents could be S. ptarmicoides, S. ohioensis, and S. riddellii whose offspring then crossed back with another S. ohioensis. Adding to the confusion, the New York populations are slightly different and might add S. uliginosa to their parentage. (Morton 1979; Semple and Ringius 1983; Michigan Natural Features Inventory 1996)

Like many goldenrods, Houghton's is known for its small, bright yellow flowers at the top of an 8-20 inch stem. The flowers are arranged in a flat-topped cluster. The well-scattered leaves are smooth, narrow, 4-5 inches long, and slightly clasping at the base. The fine hairs on the branches of the flower cluster are also distinctive. Flowers appear most frequently in August. (Michigan Natural Features Inventory 1996)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Michigan
New York
State Range of  Solidago houghtonii
Habitat
  This species is restricted to the shores of the Great Lakes, primarily Lake Huron and Michigan. The plants are usually found on moist, neutral to alkaline sandy lakeshores, and in shallow depressions between low sand ridges. Unlike the sandy habitat, they can also be found on seasonally wet limestone pavement of alvars. They may be subjected to fluctuating water levels and can be submerged during high water years, but seedlings reestablish themselves on the moist sand when the low water years come again. (Michigan Natural Features Inventory 1996; Ostlie 1990)

Distribution
  Historically located in Michigan, New York, and Ontario

Number Left
  Michigan- This species occurs in about 60 sites within 9 counties of Michigan, although highest concentrations are in Mackinac, Emmet, Cheboygen, and Presque Isle. (Michigan Natural Features Inventory 1996)

New York- There is at least one site confirmed in Genesee county and there are unconfirmed reports from Orleans county. (Young 2001)

Ontario - Seven sites. (Ostlie 1990)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G3
 
1/1/1996
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LT
 
7/18/1988
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Canada N2 R 5/22/1991  
  Michigan S3 T 3/1/1999  
  New York S1 E 4/1/2001  
  Ontario S2 R 3/31/2000  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Herbivores don't seem to pose a threat to this species. There has been limited damage sustained to this species from aphid infestations and direct consumption by larger animals. (Ostlie 1990)

Threats
  Increased human activity in shoreline areas
Residential development
Dune destabilization
Disruption of the naturally occurring fluctuating water levels prevents dune habitat from forming, and then plants do not re-establish themselves
Heavy foot and vehicular traffic
Maintenance of rights-of-way - roads, paths (NatureServe Explorer 2001)

Current Research Summary
  None known

Current Management Summary
  None known

Research Management Needs
  Thorough study of all aspects of reproductive biology including pollinator identification, self-pollination ability, seed set and dispersal.
Research is needed to determine the species actual origin and its level of genetic variability. (NatureServe Explorer 2001)

Ex Situ Needs
  None known

References

Books (Single Authors)

1999. A Forester's Field Guide to the Endangered and Threatened Plants of Michigan's Upper Penninsula. Mead Corporation, Champion International Corporation and Shelter Bay Forests, Inc.

Antonio, T.M.; Masi, S. 2001. The Sunflower Family in the Upper Midwest. IN. Indiana Academy of Science. Indianapolis.

Gleason, H.A.; Cronquist, A. 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. Bronx: The New York Botanical Garden.

Mohlenbrock, R.H. 1983. Where have all the wildflowers gone? A region-by-region guide to threatened or endangered U.S. wildflowers. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. Inc. 239p.

WWF. 1990. The official World Wildlife Fund (WWF) guide to endangered species of North America. Washington, D.C.: Beacham Publishing. 1180p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

NatureServe. (2008). NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. [Internet].Version 7.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. http://www.natureserve.org/explorer. Accessed: (June 17, 2008).

Young, S.M. (2001). New York Rare Plant Status List. New York Natural Heritage Program. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dfwmr/heritage/RPSL.pdf.. Accessed: 2001.

Journal Articles

Guire, K.E.; Voss, E.G. 1963. Distributions of distinctive shoreline plants in the Great Lakes Region. Michigan Botanist. 2: 99-114.

Morton, J.K. 1979. Observations on Houghton's goldenrod (Solidago houghtonii). Michigan Botanist. 18: 31-35.

Semple, J.C.; Ringius, G.S. 1983. Goldenrods of Ontario: Solidago and Euthamnia. University of Waterloo, Biological Series. 26: 70-72.

USFWS. 1987. Proposal to determine threatened status for Solidago houghtonii (Houghton's goldenrod). Federal Register. 52, 160: 31045-31047.

USFWS. 1987. Two plants and three animals proposed for listing. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 12, 9: 1,8.

USFWS. 1988. Approved listing rules. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 13, 8: 3.

USFWS. 1988. Determination of threatened status for Solidago houghtonii (Houghton's goldenrod). Federal Register. 53, 137: 27134-27137.

Voss, L.A. 1956. A history of the floristics in the Douglas Lake region (Emmet and Cheboygan Counties) Michigan, with an account of rejected records. Journal of Sci. Labs. Dennison Univ. 44: 16-75.

Reports

1996. Special plant abstract for Solidago houghtonii (Houghton's goldenrod). Lansing, MI: Michigan Natural Features Inventory. p.2.

Crispin, S.; Penskar, M. 1990. Solidago houghtonii; Endangered Species Manual. Michigan Natural Features Inventory. Unpublished abstract.

Ostlie, W.R. 1990. Element Stewardship Abstract for Solidago houghtonii (Houghton's goldenrod). Minneapolis, MN: The Nature Conservancy.

Randall, C. 1978. Four threatened plants for the Great Lakes shorelines. Lansing: Michigan Department of Natural Resources. p.6.

USFWS. 1991. Houghton's goldenrod (Solidato houghtonii) recovery plan. Twin Cities, Minnesota: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

USFWS. 1997. Recovery Plan for Solidago houghtonii (Houghton's goldenrod). Ft. Snelling, Minnesota: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. p.vii+ 58. [19137].


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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