CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Senecio franciscanus

Photographer:
Janette Milne

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Senecio franciscanus


Family: 
Asteraceae  
Common Name: 
San Francisco Peaks groundsel
Author: 
Greene
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
3928

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Senecio franciscanusenlarge
Photographer: Janette Milne


Senecio franciscanus is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D. contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Senecio franciscanus


The San Francisco Peaks groundsel is found only on the talus slopes in the alpine zone on San Francisco Peaks. San Francisco Peaks is a strato-volcano that rises abruptly from 2130 meters (7000 feet) to an elevation of 3852 meters (12,633 feet). This volcano is located north of Flagstaff, Arizona, and is the highest point in the southwestern United States. It is the home of the only true alpine zone in Arizona. (Goodwin 1978)

Senecio franciscanus is a dwarf perennial alpine plant that grows low to the rocky ground where it is found, to a height of only 3 to 10 cm (1.25-4 inches). Flowering stems emerge from ruffled-edge leaves with purple undersides. These stems hold clusters of one to six flowers that each contain 8 to 13 yellow ray flowers. (Barkley 1968; USFWS 1982)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Arizona
State Range of  Senecio franciscanus
Habitat
  Found in alpine tundra areas of southwestern spruce-fir forests on talus slopes between elevations of 10,991 and 12,303 feet. (USFWS 1982)

Distribution
  Found only on San Francisco Peaks in northern Arizona. (USFWS 1982)

Number Left
  Approximately 5000 individuals occur in discrete patches in an area of less than 2.6 square kilometers on the San Francisco Peaks. (USFWS 1983)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G1
 
8/21/2000
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LT
 
10/24/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
Yes
 
10/5/1987

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Arizona S1 8/1/2002  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  • The species grows on unstable volcanic talus or scree slopes. (USFWS 1982)
• Reproduction is most often vegetative via rhizomes, but occasionally via seed. (USFWS 1982)

Threats
  Threats include;
• Trampling from off-trail hiking
• Natural disturbances, such as avalanches on the steep talus slopes where the species resides
(USFWS 1983)

Current Research Summary
  None known.

Current Management Summary
  U.S.F.S. have diverted trails away from where plants are growing. Interpreters at the top of the ski lift help to explain the reason for protecting the species and curb visitors from cutting across the plant habitat.

Research Management Needs
 

Ex Situ Needs
  Multiple year collections should be made.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Kearney, T.H.; Peebles, R.H. 1973. Arizona flora. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. 1085p.

Rutman, S. 1992. Handbook of Arizona's endangered, threatened, and candidate plants. Phoenix, Arizona: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

WWF. 1990. The official World Wildlife Fund (WWF) guide to endangered species of North America. Washington, D.C.: Beacham Publishing. 1180p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

ESIS. (1998). Endangered Species System (ESIS): Fish and Wildlife Exchange. [Web site;] Virginia Tech. http://fwie.fw.vt.edu/WWW/esis/. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Barkley, T.M. 1968. Taxonomy of Senecio multilobatus and its allies. Brittonia. 20: 267-284.

Greene, E. 1889. New or noteworthy species VI. Pittonia. 2: 13-24.

Little, E. 1941. Alpine flora of San Francisco Mountain, Arizona. Madroño. 6: 65-96.

Nabhan, G. 1989. Rescuing Arizona's Endangered Plants. Arizona Highways. 65: 35-41.

USFWS. 1976. Proposed Endangered Status for 1700 U.S. Plants. Federal Register. 41: 24523-24572.

USFWS. 1982. Proposed Threatened Status for Senecio franciscanus (San Francisco Peaks Groundsel) with Critical Habitat. Federal Register. 47, 225: 52483-52487.

USFWS. 1982. San Francisco Peaks Groundsel Proposed as Threatened. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 7, 12: 1, 7.

USFWS. 1983. Comment Period Reopened for Proposed Plant. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 8, 4: 4, 6.

USFWS. 1983. Final Rule to Determine Senecio franciscanus (San Francisco Peaks groundsel) to be a Threatened Species and Determination of its Critical Habitat. Federal Register. 48, 226: 52743-52746.

Reports

Boucher, P. 1984. Propagation of alpine plants on the Coconino National Forest. Unpublished report on file at USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest.

Boucher, P.; Goodwin, G. 1984. San Francisco Peaks alpine tundra survey results for Senecio franciscanus Greene in Elden and Flagstaff Districts. Report prepared for USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest.

Fletcher, R. 1978. Status report on Senecio franciscanus. Prepared for USDA Forest Service, Region 3.

Fletcher, R.; Goodwin, G.; Boucher, P.; Reid, M. 1984. Biological assessment for Senecio franciscanus. On file at USDA Forest Service, Region 3.

Goodwin, G. 1978. An assessment of impacts created by past and present development on the alpine tundra zone of the San Francisco Peaks. Report prepared for USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest.

Holden, T.; Goodwin, G.; Fletcher, R.; Boucher, P. 1984. Alpine tundra interim management plan for Senecio franciscanus Greene, Flagstaff and Elden Ranger Districts, Coconino Natinal Forest. Report prepared for USDA Forest Service, Region 3.

Phillips, A.M., III; Peterson, E.M. 1980. Status report: Senecio franciscanus Greene. Albuquerque, NM: On file at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Rominger, J.M. 1976. Senecio franciscanus habitat study notes. Unpubl. field notes prepared for the USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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