CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Oxytropis campestris var. chartacea

Photographer:

Heading for profile page
CPC Home Join now
About CPC
CPC National Collection
Conservation Directory Resources
Invasive Plant Species Plant News
Plant Links Participating Institutions
Contribute
Search CPC
Search    Alphabetical List    Reference Finder    CPC Home


CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Oxytropis campestris var. chartacea


Family: 
Fabaceae  
Common Names: 
Cold Mountain crazyweed, Fassett's locoweed, field locoweed, Northern yellow locoweed
Author: 
(Fassett) Barneby
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
3068

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


Profile Links
 ITIS
 Tropicos
 PLANTS
 Fish & WildLife
 Forest Service

Oxytropis campestris var. chartacea is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Lindsey Parsons contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Oxytropis campestris var. chartacea


O. campestris var. chartacea is one of the famous locoweeds known for causing cattle to behave in unusual ways. It is endemic to central Wisconsin. This species is extremely shade intolerant and suffers from habitat destruction and succession of the lake shores it inhabits. It relies on changing lake levels to maintain a moderate level of disturbance to keep out grasses and woody species that could shade it or crowd it out. Flowers appear from mid-May through June, and seeds germinate on the lake shores where the species is found, as water levels drop during the summer months. (WIS 2002)

This plant has a thick taproot, with many leaves clustered in rosette at the base of a short stem. Leaves are compound and 2-8 inches long, with 15 pairs of pointed leaflets, that are 5-20 millimeters in length. Most of the plant, including the leaves are covered in dense silky white hair, which gives the entire plant a silver/gray appearance. It has pea-like flowers that are rose/purple. There are 7-14 flowered raceme on each 12 inch stalk. The fruits develop as individual pods from each flower. The pods have papery walls with silky white or black hairs. They're 1/3 inch to 1/2 inch long. Each pod has numerous seeds inside. The reproduction is entirely through seed and not rhizomes. The seeds themselves are 1-2 millimeters wide. Each plant can have 1-10 individual reproductive spikes, and each spike can have 10-20 or more flowers and resulting legumes. The flowers can change color with age. (USFWS 1988)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Wisconsin
State Range of  Oxytropis campestris var. chartacea
Habitat
  Found on the sand or gravel shorelines of small, landlocked lakes in areas that receive sunlight for part of the day. In other words, this species does not compete will with other species that can shade it out--it is shade intolerant. This open habitat is maintained by lake level fluctuations. (USFWS 1988)

This species is associated with Carex spp., Juncus spp, and Eleocharis spp. (USFWS 1988)

Distribution
  Endemic to central Wisconsin. (USFWS 1988)

Number Left
  At the time of listing, Oxytropis campestris var. chartacea was known from six sites containing less than 5,000
individual plants total, in Portage and Waushara Counties in central Wisconsin. (USFWS 1988)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G5T1T2
 
7/27/2004
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LT
 
10/24/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
Yes
 
3/29/1991

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Wisconsin S1 LT 1/12/2001  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  None known.

Threats
  Lakeshore recreational development
Shoreline development for houses
Livestock grazing
Vulnerable to disturbances of the local hydrological regime
Motor vehicle use
Trampling
Herbicide and pesticide use in agricultural areas,
Due to the locoweed's low numbers, any botanical collecting would pose a significant threat to the genetic health of the species
Over-irrigation of nearby lands draws from the lake, changing its water level
Decreasing woods nearby
(USFWS 1988)

Current Research Summary
  None known.

Current Management Summary
  None known.

Research Management Needs
  All existing populations need tracking of:
population trends
flower production
seed set
pollinator visitation frequency
lakeshore development
lakeshore (beach) traffic
lake water quality
aspects of the life history
pollinator identification
pollination success
seed germination requirements
duration of seed bank viability
growth requirements.

Ex Situ Needs
 

References

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

WIDNR. (2002). Wisconsin Endangered and Threatened Plants Species. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/land/er/factsheets/00etlist2.htm. Accessed: 2002.

WIS. (2002). Wisconsin Vascular Plants--on species, including maps and photos. Wisconsin State Herbarium: University of Wisconsin - Madison (WIS). http://www.botany.wisc.edu/wisflora/. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Barimah-Asare, J. 1991. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Two Species in Leguminosae: Lathyrus maritimus (L) Bigel. and Oxytropis campestris (L) DC. Masters Abstracts International. 31-03: 1133.

Rees, M.D. 1988. Final listing rules approved for 25 species. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 13, 9-10: 3-5.

USFWS. 1988. Determination of Threatened Status for Oxytropis campestris var. chartacea. Federal Register. 53, 188: 37970-37972.

USFWS. 1988. Habitat loss threatens two midwestern plants. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. XIII, 1: 1.

Reports

USFWS. 1991. Fassett's Locoweed Recovery Plan. Twin Cities, Minnesota: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. p.57.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
California
Oregon
Washington
Idaho
Nevada
Arizona
Utah
Montana
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Oklahoma
Texas
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
Arkansas
Louisiana
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan
Michigan
Indiana
Ohio
Kentucky
Tennessee
Mississippi
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
South Carolina
North Carolina
Virginia
West Virginia
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
New Jersey
Connecticut
Rhode Island
Massachusetts
Vermont
New Hampshire
Maine
New York
New York
Hawaii
Hawaii
Hawaii
Hawaii