CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta

Photographer:
Joyce Maschinski

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta


Family: 
Papaveraceae  
Common Name: 
Sacramento prickly-poppy
Author: 
G.B. Ownbey
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
277

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisectaenlarge
Photographer: Joyce Maschinski
jmaschinski[at]fairchildgarden.org


Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D. contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta


The Sacramento prickle-poppy produces attractive, grapefruit-sized white flowers while spiny leaves and fruits protect the plant from many predators. This species is found along drainages and roadsides near the Sacramento Mountains in New Mexico. It is a robust, herbaceous perennial, with multiple branching stems. It grows to about 0.5-1.5 m in height and has blue-green leaves with veins that are armored with stout yellow spines. It flowers from May to August. Another subspecies, Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pleiacantha, is considered common. This subspecies has leaves that are less deeply divided, capsule spines that are more dense, and branched at the base, and a yellow-orange latex in its stem. (New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council 1999)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  New Mexico
State Range of  Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta
Habitat
  Loose, gravelly soils in open disturbed sites; canyon bottoms and slopes, and occasionally along roadsides; found at 1,300-2,200 m (4,200-7,100 ft) in elevation. (New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council 1999)

Distribution
  In and around Otero County in New Mexico, populations are found in 10 canyons on the western slope of the Sacramento Mountains from Fresnal Canyon on the north to Escondido Canyon on the south. (New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council 1999)

Number Left
  In the late 1980s there were approximately 1,300 known individuals, but the number has likely declined since then. (New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council 1999)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G4G5T2
 
12/30/1994
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LE
 
8/24/1989
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
Yes
 
8/31/1994

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  New Mexico S2 8/29/2002  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  None known.

Threats
  Threats include:
Road construction and maintenance
Flash floods
Trampling and grazing from livestock
Off-road vehicles (NatureServe 2001)
Activities like highway maintenance or pipeline construction are threats because they could destroy some plants. However, this activity may also create suitable habitat (New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council 1999)

Current Research Summary
  Seeds of this species are held by Desert Botanical Garden and The Arboretum at Flagstaff.

Current Management Summary
  None known.

Research Management Needs
  Studies into the basic biology of the species, as well as habitat requirements, would be beneficial.

Ex Situ Needs
  Continued seed collection and banking to ensure a genetically representative sample.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Martin, W.C.; Hutchins, C.R. 1980-1981. A flora of New Mexico. Germany: Hirschberg. 2591p.

Books (Sections)

Tepedino, V.J. 2002. Section III. Environmental Monitoring. III.5 The Reproductive Biology of Rare Rangeland Plants and Their Vulnerability to Insecticides. Grasshoppers: Their biology, identification and management, User Handbook.

Books (Edited Volumes)

New Mexico Native plants Protection Advisory Committee. 1984 A handbook of rare and endemic plants of New Mexico. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press.

Conference Proceedings

Sivinski, R.; Knight, P. Narrow Endemism in the New Mexico Flora. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-283. Proceedings of the Southwestern Rare and Endangered Plant Conference; September 11-14; Flagstaff, AZ. In: Maschinski, J.; Hammond, H.D.; Holter, L., editors. 1996. USDA and US Forest Service. p 286-296.

Electronic Sources

(1999). New Mexico Rare Plants Information. New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council: Albuquerque, NM. Version 15. http://nmrareplants.unm.edu/nmrptc/rarelist.htm. Accessed: 2002.

NatureServe. (2008). NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. [Internet].Version 7.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. http://www.natureserve.org/explorer. Accessed: (June 17, 2008).

Journal Articles

Ownbey, G.B. 1958. Monograph of the Argemone for North America and the West Indies. Memoirs of the Torrey Botanical Club. 21: 1-159.

USFWS. 1976. Proposed Endangered Status for 1700 U.S. Plants. Federal Register. 41: 24523-24572.

USFWS. 1987. Proposal to determine Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta (Sacramento prickly poppy) to be an endangered species. Federal Register. 52, 133: 26164-26167.

USFWS. 1989. Final Rule to Determine Argemone plelacantha ssp. pinnatisecta (Sacramento prickly poppy) To Be an Endangered Species. Federal Register. 54, 163: 35302-35305.

Reports

Soreng, R.J. 1982. Status report on Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta. Alburquerque, NM: U.S. Forest Service, Region 3.

USFWS. 1994. Sacramento prickly poppy (Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta) Recovery Plan. Albuquerque, New Mexico: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. p.42.

Theses

Coomes, Richard Merril. 1969. The alkaloids of Argemone pleiacantha, Greene, structure elucidation and synthesis of Argemone alkaloids, and the chemistry of Protopine-type acid salts. [Ph.D. Thesis]: Colorado State University. 154p.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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