CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Physaria globosa

Photographer:
Lucille McCook

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Physaria globosa


Family: 
Brassicaceae  
Common Names: 
globe bladderpod, Lesquereux's mustard, Short's bladderpod
Author: 
(Desv.) S. Wats.
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
2499

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Physaria globosaenlarge
Photographer: Lucille McCook


Physaria globosa is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Kimberlie McCue, Ph.D. contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Physaria globosa


Physaria globosa is a diminutive plant that is covered with dense hairs that give its leaves a gray-green appearance. The small flowers have beautiful spoon-shaped petals that are displayed from April to early June. The name of the plant is derived from the globe-shaped fruits it produces.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Indiana
Kentucky
Tennessee
State Range of  Physaria globosa
Habitat
  Physaria globosa occurs on steep, rocky, wooded slopes and talus areas at the base of these slopes, also on the top of ledges and at the base of cliffs. All known populations occur on south to west facing slopes (Shea 1993).

Common woody associates include: Acer negundo, Aesculus glabra, and Ulmus americana. Herbaceous associates include: Galium aparine, Lamium sp., Silene virginica and Polygonatum biflorum.

Distribution
  Five counties in northeastern Kentucky, five counties in north central Tennessee, and one county in southern Indiana.

Number Left
  There were at least 57 sites that historically supported Short’s bladderpod. Of these 57 sites, only 33
are currently known:
Eighteen known locations for Short’s bladderpod in Tennessee
Fourteen known locations in Kentucky
One known location in Indiana
(USFWS 2002)

All remaining populations are small and vulnerable to extirpation. Numbers of individuals in known populations range from a few to several hundred. The number of individuals at a site will vary from year to year. (Shea 1993)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G2
 
12/31/2005
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
C
 
12/10/2008
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Indiana S1 SE 1/11/2000  
  Kentucky S1 T 7/1/1997  
  Tennessee S2 PE 5/1/1998  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  None known.

Threats
  Road construction
Roadside mowing and maintenance
Trash dumping
Grazing
Competition with invasive species and possibly excessive shading
(Shea 1993; USFWS 2002)

Current Research Summary
  None known

Current Management Summary
  None known.

Research Management Needs
  Studies of reproductive biology are deemed critical.
Use of herbicides along roads where P. globosa occurs should be eliminated.

Ex Situ Needs
  Greenhouse (and field) studies are needed to determine appropriate light levels for the species. This will inform management on the efficacy of opening canopy to increase light levels for P. globosa populations.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Pyne, M.; Gay, M.; Shea, A. 1995. Guide to rare plants - Tennessee Division of Forestry District 5. Nashville: Tennessee Dept. Agriculture, Division of Forestry.

Rollins, R.C. 1993. The Cruciferae of continental North America: Systematics of the mustard family from the Arctic to Panama. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. 976p.

Rollins, R.C.; Shaw, E.A. 1973. The genus Lesquerella (Cruciferae) in North America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 288p.

Journal Articles

Brushaber, J. 1994. Lesquerella globosa rediscovered in Jessamine County, Kentucky. Transactions of the Kentucky Academy of Science. 55, 1 / 2: 55.

Cranfill, R.; Baskin, J.M.; Medley, M.E. 1985. Taxonomy, distribution and rarity status of Leavenworthia and Lesquerella (Brassicaceae) in Kentucky. SIDA. 11, 2: 189-199.

Payson, E.B. 1922. A Monograph of the genus Lesquerella. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden News. 8, 103-236

White, D.L. 1998. Rare Plants of the Bluegrass. Naturally Kentucky, Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission. Number 26: 1,4.

Reports

Kral, R. 1983. A report on some rare, threatened, or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South. Athens, GA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service. p.1305. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service Technical.

Shea, M.M. 1993. Status survey report on Lesquerella globosa (Desv.) Wats. Frankfort, Kentucky: Prepared under cooperative agreement 14-16-0004-89-956 for the Kentucky Endangered Plant Species Program. p.122.

USFWS. 2002. Candidate and Listing Priority Assignment Forms. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

White, Deb. Not dated. Lesquerella globosa Site Conservation Plans. Unpublished report. Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission. p.13.


  This profile was updated on 10/15/2014
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