CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Apios priceana

Photographer:
Kimberlie McCue

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Apios priceana


Family: 
Fabaceae  
Common Names: 
Groundnut, Price's ground nut, Price's potato-bean, traveler's delight
Author: 
B.L. Robins.
Growth Habit: 
Vine, Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
149

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Apios priceanaenlarge
Photographer: Kimberlie McCue
kmccue[at]dbg.org

Apios priceanaenlarge
Photographer: Kimberlie McCue
kmccue[at]dbg.org


Apios priceana is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Kimberlie McCue, Ph.D. contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Apios priceana


Price's Ground Nut was first collected by Sadie Price in Kentucky in 1896 (USFWS 1993). The plant is an herbaceous, perennial vine that grows from a stout, thick tuber. Apios priceana blooms from mid-June through August, producing clusters of fleshy greenish-white or brownish pink flowers. Fruit is set in late August through early October.

A. priceana has potential value as a food source for humans. The plant produces large single tubers which are edible and may have been used by Native American Indians and early settlers as food (Walter et al. 1986, USFWS 1993). However, A. priceana may be of greatest value as a source of germplasm for breeding with other Apios species.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Alabama
Kentucky
Mississippi
Tennessee
State Range of  Apios priceana
Habitat
  A. priceana occurs in open woods and along wood edges in limestone areas. Several populations grow along highway rights-of-way and powerline corridors. Soils are well-drained loams on old alluvium or over limestone (Kral 1983).

Often associated with Acer saccharum, Amphicarpa bracteata, Campanula americana, Cercis canandensis, Lindera benzoin, Quercus muhlenbergii, Tilia americana, Toxicodendron radicans, and Ulmus rubra (USFWS 1993).

Distribution
  A. priceana is found within the Coastal Plain, Interior Low Plateaus, and Appalachian Plateaus physiographic provinces of the United States (USFWS 1993). States included in the range of A. priceana are, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama (USFWS 1993).

Number Left
  A. priceana is currently known from 25 sites in fifteen counties in four states. Most of these sites contain fewer that 25 individuals.

Counties include: Alabama: Autauga, Madison, and Marshall counties. Kentucky: Nelson, Livingston, Edmonson, Warren, and Hickman counties. Mississippi: Chickasaw, Clay, Kemper, Oktibbeha, and Lee (Coonewah Creek Chalk Bluffs Preserve) counties. Tennessee: Montgomery, Davidson, Williamson, Grundy, and Marion counties (USFWS 1993). The plant was reported from Illinois in the past, but is now considered to be extirpated from that state.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G2
 
7/9/2004
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LT
 
2/5/1990
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
Yes
 
2/10/1993

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Alabama S1 9/18/1991  
  Illinois SX 8/9/1989  
  Kentucky S1 E 1/1/2000  
  Mississippi S1 LT 1/1/2000  
  Tennessee S2 E 5/1/1998  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Pollinators include the long tailed skipper (Urbanus proteus L.), and honey bees and bumble bees (USFWS 1993).

Threats
  Threats include:
Habitat loss due to highway maintenance and cattle grazing and trampling
Logging (clear cutting)
Succession (leading to a closed tree canopy)
Herbicide use
Invasive species
(USFWS 1993)

Current Research Summary
  Missouri Botanical Garden curators have collected seeds from this species, both in the wild and from garden-propagated plants. These seeds are stored in seed banks.
Germination protocols have been established (incisions made in seed coat and incubated at 70 degrees Fahrenheit).

Current Management Summary
  No formalized management has been created or implemented. There has been some discussion about reintroducing this plant into public lands, but nothing has occurred yet.

Research Management Needs
  Set forth in the recovery plan, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (1993) outlines the following recovery needs:
search for and establish new populations, research all aspects of life history research (pollination ecology, seed production, germination, seedling recruitment and survival).

Ex Situ Needs
  Maintain plants and seeds ex situ
Provide public information about the species

References

Books (Single Authors)

1989. USFWS Redbook of Endangered and Threatened Species. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Great Lakes Region.

Isely, D. 1990. Vascular flora of the southeastern United States. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press. 258p.

Isely, D. 1998. Native and Naturalized Leguminosae (Fabaceae) of the United States (exclusive of Alaska and Hawaii). Salt Lake City, Utah: Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum, Brigham Young University.

Pyne, M.; Gay, M.; Shea, A. 1995. Guide to rare plants - Tennessee Division of Forestry District 4. Nashville: Tennessee Dept. Agriculture, Division of Forestry.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Books (Edited Volumes)

Bowles, M.L.; Diersing, V.E; Ebinger, J.E.; Schultz, H.C. 1981 Endangered and threatened vertebrate animals and vascular plants of Illinois. Illinois Department of Conservation. 190p.

Electronic Sources

(2002). Endangered Species. Alabama Forestry Commission--Alabama's TREASURED FORESTS magazine. http://www.forestry.state.al.us/publication/Endangered_Species_Articles_Index.htm. Accessed: 2002.

(2002). New York Botanical Garden--The Virtual Herbarium. [Searchable Web site] New York Botanical Garden. Fordham Road Bronx, New York. http://scisun.nybg.org:8890/searchdb/owa/wwwspecimen.searchform. Accessed: 2002.

CPC. (2002). Notable Natives. The Center for Plant Conservation. http://www.centerforplantconservation.org/peril/peril11.html. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Browne, E.T.; Athey, R. 1976. Herbarium and field studies of Kentucky plants. III. New or rare flowering plants in western Kentucky. Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Society. 92: 104-109.

Chester, E.W.; Holt, S.E. 1990. An update on Price's potato bean. Kentucky Native Plant Society Newsletter. 5, 1: 7-8.

Mahler, W.F. 1970. Manual of the Legumes of Tennessee. Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Sciences. 45, 3: 65-96.

Morris, M.W; Bryson, C.T.; Warren, R.C. 1993. Rare vascular plants and associated plant communities from the Sand Creek chalk bluffs, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi. Castanea. 58, 4: 250-259.

Norquist, C. 1990. Endangered and threatend wildlife and plants; threatened status for Apios priceana (Price's potato-bean). Federal Register. 55, 4: 429-432.

Pickering, J. 1989. A collection of rare species from Missouri and surrounding states, displayed at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Guide prepared for The Genetics of Rare Plant Conservation: A Conference on Integrated Strategies for Conservation and Management.

Robinson, B.L. 1898. A new species of Apios from Kentucky. Botanical Gazette. 25: 450-453.

Seabrook, J.A.E.; Dionne, L.A. 1976. Studies on the genus Apios. I. Chromosome number and distribution of Apios americana and A. priceana. Canadian Journal of Botany. 54: 2567-2572.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. 1989. Listing proposals. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 24, 6: 4-5, 11.

USFWS. 1990. Threatened status for Apios priceana (Price's potato-bean). Federal Register. 55, 4: 429-433.

Walter, W.M.; Croom, E.M., Jr.; Catignani, G.L.; Thresher, W.C. 1986. Compositional study of Apios priceana tubers. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. 34, 1: 39-41.

Magazine Articles

CPC. 1987. Zone IX adopts two endangered species (Salvia penstemonoides and Apios priceana). CPC-Garden Club of America (GCA) Plant Adoption Press Release:

Newspaper Articles

Hilts, Philip J. 1988 Tuesday, December 6. U.S. Faces Big Loss of Plant Species: Botanists Consider Emergency Measures. The Washington Post; Washington, D.C.

Reports

Kral, R. 1983. A report on some rare, threatened or endangered forest related vascular plants of the south. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Forest Service. p.718. USFS technical publication R8-TP2, . Vol. 1.

Kral, R. 1983. A report on some rare, threatened, or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South. Athens, GA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service. p.1305. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service Technical.

Medley, M.E. 1980. Status report on Apios priceana. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Unpublished report. contract #14-16-0004-79-105.

MSNHP. 2000. Special Plants Tracking List. Jackson, Mississippi: Mississippi Natural Heritage Program, Museum of Natural Science, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries & Parks, . p.9.

Somers, P. 1982. Tennessee element state ranking form. Tennessee Natural Heritage Program. p.1. Unpublished report.

USFWS. 1993. Recovery plan for Apios priceana. Jackson, Mississippi: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. p.43.

White, J. 1981. Illinois state element ranking form. Illinois Natural Heritage Inventory. p.1. unpublished report.

Theses

Seabrook, J.A.E. 1973. A biosystematic study of the genus Apios fabricius (Leguminosae) with special reference to Apios americana Medikus. [M.S. Thesis]: University of New Brunswick. Fredericton.

Woods, Michael. 1988. A revision of Apios and Cochlianthus (Leguminosae). [Ph.D.]: Southern Illinois University. Carbondale. 162p.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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