CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Allium gooddingii

Photographer:
Janette Milne

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Allium gooddingii


Family: 
Liliaceae  
Common Names: 
Goodding's onion, Gooding's onion
Author: 
Ownbey
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
76

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Allium gooddingiienlarge
Photographer: Janette Milne


Allium gooddingii is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D. contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Allium gooddingii


Goodding's onion is a delicate perennial with reddish-purple flowers and a pungent onion aroma. It appears after snow melt and blooms from late May to mid-June. It is often hard to locate and identify plants due to heavy grazing by domestic and wild ungulates that reduce the aboveground parts of the plants to short stubs and may not even leave that much. For this reason its population numbers are hard to quantify when the habitat is not protected.

Luckily for this species, it was listed as a candidate for federal endangered/threatened status. The need for protection of this species was recognized in 1998 when a conservation agreement between the Forest Service and the Environmental Protection Agency was put in place in order to reduce or eliminate threats to it. Two years later, this protection paid off, when Allium gooddingii was removed from the list for candidate status. (USFWS 2000)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Arizona
New Mexico
State Range of  Allium gooddingii
Habitat
  Typically found in mature forests, along north-trending drainage bottoms associated with perennial, intermittent and ephemeral stream courses in mixed-conifer and spruce-fir zones at elevations ranging from 7,000-9,400 ft. elevation (USFWS 2000).

Distribution
  Apache-Sitgreaves, Coronado, Lincoln, and Gila National Forests of New Mexico (USFWS 2000).

Number Left
  Populations are known from Santa Catalina (Pima County) and White Mountains (Apache County) of Arizona and the Mogollan Mountains (Grant and Catron Counties) and Sierra Blanca Peak (Otero County) (USFWS 2000).

Protection

Global Rank:  
G4
 
3/3/1999
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
RT
 
8/20/2000
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Arizona S3S4 8/1/2002  
  Navaho Nation 3 E 3/1/2001  
  New Mexico S1 8/29/2002  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  • Best plant reproduction and growth occurs where it is protected from domestic and wild ungulate grazing.
• Observations of plants under cultivation at the Arboretum at Flagstaff indicate that this species may be apomictic (self-fertile). (Arizona Game and Fish Department 1999)
• Reproduction is through seed and vegetatively from bulbils, as most onion species do (Arizona Game and Fish Department 1999).
• Pollinators include hymenopterans, dipterans, and lepidopterans (Arizona Game and Fish Department 1999).
• Seeds readily germinate (Spellenberg 1982, Fletcher 1984)

Threats
  As stated by USFWS (2000), threats include:
• Timber harvesting
• Livestock grazing
• Road construction
• Recreation

Current Research Summary
  • Plants have been cultivated at the Arboretum of Flagstaff. (Arizona Game and Fish Department 1999)

Current Management Summary
  Goodding's onion is still monitored periodically on U.S. Forest Service and Navajo Nation lands. A 1998 conservation agreement between the FS and the EPA includes plans to reduce or eliminate threats to the onion by maintaining the canopy cover and avoiding ground disturbance and erosion during timber harvesting activities in and near occupied sites, prohibiting new livestock structures that would attract grazing ungulates to occupied sites, and prohibiting or redesigning new roads and trails found to adversely affect this species of onion. (USFWS 2000)

Research Management Needs
  Most populations are not considered to be threatened, but continued monitoring is advised.

Ex Situ Needs
  Cultivation requirements are known and seed is in long-term storage. New Mexico populations need to be collected.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Lehr, J.H. 1978. A Catalog of the Flora of Arizona. Phoenix, Arizona: Desert Botanical Garden. 33p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Books (Edited Volumes)

James C. Hickman, Editor. 1993 The Jepson manual: Higher plants of California. Berkeley: University of California Press. 1400p.

Electronic Sources

Arizona Game and Fish Department. (1999). Plant Abstracts. Compiled and edited by the Heritage Data Management System, Arizona Game and Fish Department, Phoenix, AZ. http://www.gf.state.az.us/frames/fishwild/hdms_site/Abstracts/Plants/abstracts%20-%20plants.htm. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Ownbey, G.S. 1947. The genus Allium in Arizona. Research Studies of the State College of Washington. 15, 4: 221-224.

USFWS. 2000. Notice of Reclassification of Nine Candidate Taxa. Federal Register. 64, 204: 63044-63047.

Reports

2002. General Species Information. Phoenix, Arizona: Arizona Ecological Services Field Office.

Fletcher, R. 1978. Allium gooddingii supplement. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Unpublished report prepared for the U.S. Forest Service Regional Office.

Fletcher, R. 1984. Allium gooddingii Status Report Supplement. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Unpublished report prepared for the U.S. Forest Service Regional Office.

Fonseca, J.; Scalero, D. 1999. Determining Valuable Species within Pima County, AZ: a discussion paper for the Sonoran desert conservation plan. Tuscon, AZ: Pima County Flood Control District.

Laurenzi, A.W.; Warren, P.L. 1987. Allium gooddingii on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest: Current status and management recommendations. Springerville, Arizona: Unpublished report submitted to Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest.

Spellenberg, R. 1982. Status report on Allium gooddingii. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Unpublished report to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

USFWS, USFS;. 1997. GooddingΖs Onion (Allium gooddingii) Conservation Agreement. Albuquerque, New Mexico: USDA Forest Service, Southwestern Region and USDI Fish and Wildlife Service, Southwest Region.

Wagner, W.L.; Sabo, D.G. 1977. Status report for Allium gooddingii. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Unpublished report for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.


  This profile was updated on 9/28/2010
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