CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Rhus kearneyi

Photographer:
Lynda Pritchett-Kozak

Heading for profile page
CPC Home Join now
About CPC
CPC National Collection
Conservation Directory Resources
Invasive Plant Species Plant News
Plant Links Participating Institutions
Contribute
Search CPC
Search    Alphabetical List    Reference Finder    CPC Home


CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Rhus kearneyi


Family: 
Anacardiaceae  
Common Name: 
Kearney sumac
Author: 
Barkley
Growth Habit: 
Tree, Shrub
CPC Number: 
7049

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


Profile Links
 ITIS
 Tropicos
 PLANTS
 Fish & WildLife

Rhus kearneyienlarge
Photographer: Lynda Pritchett-Kozak

Rhus kearneyienlarge
Photographer: Lynda Pritchett-Kozak


Rhus kearneyi is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Kathleen C. Rice contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Rhus kearneyi


Rhus kearneyi plants are large showy, evergreen shrubs that grow up to three meters in height. The dioecious flowers grow in creamy white clusters and bloom in March. Petioles and young twigs are a striking reddish color. Many species of Rhus can be found in small numbers in the canyons of northern Sonora, Mexico.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Arizona
State Range of  Rhus kearneyi
Habitat
  Plants are found growing along steep canyons and drainages (relatively few individuals) (Kearney and Peebles 1973).

Distribution
  Rhus kearneyi is known from the Tinajas Altas, Cabeza Prieta, and Gila Mountains of southwestern Arizona, at elevations of 1000 to 1500 feet (Kearney and Peebles 1973).

Number Left
  There is only a single population known in the U.S. from one canyon in the tinajas Altas Mountains on the Barry Goldwater Bombing Range.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G4
 
4/5/1994
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
RT
 
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Arizona  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Kearney's Sumac needs the protection and shade of deep canyon walls.

Threats
  Because it is inherently rare, this species may be threatened by stochastic events.

Current Research Summary
  Desert Botanical Garden collected seeds of R. kearneyi in 1986. Plants are easily propagated from seeds and cuttings, but do not thrive in containers for longer than a few years. Over fifty plants can be found in ornamental exhibits within the Garden. The Garden has produced thousands of seeds in cultivation on plants grown to reproductive maturity from field-collected seeds. This species is really attractive in cultivation and has potential valuable horticultural contribution to low-water use landscapes. (Desert Botanical Garden 2000)

Current Management Summary
  Although plants are not undergoing any immediate human induced threat, management planning should include seed banking for potential reintroduction in the occurrence of a devastating stochastic event.

Research Management Needs
  This species general biology and ecology would be interesting to know.

Ex Situ Needs
 

References

Books (Single Authors)

Kartesz, J.T. 1993. Species distribution data for vascular plants of 70 geographical areas, from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Kartesz, J.T. 1996. Species distribution data at state and province level for vascular plant taxa of the United States, Canada, and Greenland (accepted records), from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Kearney, T.H.; Peebles, R.H. 1973. Arizona flora. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. 1085p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

(2000). Center for Plant Conservation's National Living Collection--Profiles. Desert Botanical Garden. http://www.dbg.org/Collections/cpc.html. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

USFWS. 1976. Proposed Endangered Status for 1700 U.S. Plants. Federal Register. 41: 24523-24572.

Reports

Little, E.L., Jr. 1979. Checklist of United States trees (native and naturalized): Agriculture Handbook No. 541. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Forest Service. p.375.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
California
Oregon
Washington
Idaho
Nevada
Arizona
Utah
Montana
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Oklahoma
Texas
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
Arkansas
Louisiana
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan
Michigan
Indiana
Ohio
Kentucky
Tennessee
Mississippi
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
South Carolina
North Carolina
Virginia
West Virginia
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
New Jersey
Connecticut
Rhode Island
Massachusetts
Vermont
New Hampshire
Maine
New York
New York
Hawaii
Hawaii
Hawaii
Hawaii