CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Diervilla rivularis

Photographer:
Rob Nicholson

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Diervilla rivularis


Family: 
Caprifoliaceae  
Common Names: 
hairy bush honeysuckle, Hairy bush-honeysuckle, mountain bush honeysuckle
Author: 
Gattinger
Growth Habit: 
Shrub
CPC Number: 
6237

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Diervilla rivularisenlarge
Photographer: Rob Nicholson


Diervilla rivularis is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Irina Kadis contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Diervilla rivularis


Diervilla rivularis is a North American shrub named in compliment of a French traveler, N. Dierville, who first brought the plant from Canada to Europe in 1699 (Small 1933, Fernald 1949). There are three Diervilla species, all of them eastern North American: D. lonicera, D. sessilifolia, and D. rivularis (Fernald 1949). All three are deciduous shrubs of small to medium size, spreading by means of underground stems and forming colonies.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Alabama
Georgia
North Carolina
Tennessee
Virginia
State Range of  Diervilla rivularis
Habitat
  Damp woods and rocky banks to full sun at disturbed areas (along roads) (Small 1933, Fernald 1949, Clark 1971, Dirr 1988, Foote and Jones 1994).

Distribution
  The Blue Ridge to Appalachian Plateau, Georgia to Alabama, and North Carolina. D. rivularis and D. sessilifolia have generally the same range overlapping with D. lonicera in Virginia and North Carolina (Small 1933, Fernald 1949, Clark 1971, Dirr 1988, Foote and Jones 1994).

Number Left
  Remaining population sites and sizes are largely unknown.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G3
 
9/8/2000
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
 
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Alabama S? 8/1/1996  
  North Carolina S1 T 1/1/2002  
  Tennessee S2 T 4/3/2001  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Ecological relationships are unknown.

Threats
  Road construction, right-of-way maintenance.
Hydroelectric facilities, dams.
Erosion after logging.
Disturbance by thinning trees in the immediate proximity.
Overtopping by arboreal species or fast growing herbs or vines
Natural habitats vanish due to plant succession.
Invasive species.


Current Research Summary
  Although studies in propagation have been conducted, no research program is in place.
Propagation by seed (sow directly, without pre-treatment) brings consistent good result (Bir 1992).
Propagation by softwood cuttings: in June-July, 2,500-5,000 ppm K-IBA, under mist or fog (easily rooted).

Current Management Summary
  No formal plan has been designed or implemented.

Research Management Needs
  Comparative genetic study of the three Diervilla species would be helpful, as their taxonomic status is not yet clarified.
Population identification and monitoring would be useful in devising a protection plan.

Ex Situ Needs
 

References

Books (Single Authors)

Bir, R.E. 1992. Growing and Propagating Showy Native Woody Plants. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: The University of North Carolina Press.

Dirr, M.A. 1998. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants. Champaign, Illinois: Stipes Publishing L. L. C.

Foote, L.E.; Jones, S.B., Jr. 1994. Native Shrubs and Woody Vines of the Southeast. Oregon: Timber Press.

Radford, A.E.; Ahles, H.E.; Bell, C.R. 1968. Manual of the vascular flora of the Carolinas. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press. 1183p.

Weakley, A.S. 2002. Flora of the Carolinas and Virginia, Working Draft. Unpublished--available on-line.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Journal Articles

Clark, R.C. 1971. The woody plants of Alabama. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden. 58: 99-242.

Fernald, M.L. 1949. Contributions from the Gray Herbarium of Harvard University, No. CLXIX. Part II. Studies of eastern American plants. Rhodora. 51: 60.

Sorrie, B.A. 1987. Notes on the rare flora of Massachusetts. Rhodora. 89, 858: 113-196.


  This profile was updated on 9/28/2010
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