CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Astragalus tennesseensis

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Astragalus tennesseensis


Family: 
Fabaceae  
Common Name: 
Tennessee milkvetch
Author: 
Gray ex Chapman
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
501

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Astragalus tennesseensis is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 

 
Astragalus tennesseensis


This species is in the same genus as the plants referred to as 'locoweed', which are well known for their affect on cattle. Due to research by government organizations and universities, we now know a great deal about propagating this species from seed and cuttings (Native Plants Network 2002, letter from Marlin Bowles 4.Feb.1988). As a result, the Holden Arboretum in Mentor, Ohio has been able to cultivate this species and has created suitable habitat for this milkvetch on their grounds. This species produces clusters of creamy flowers in April and May and it produces seed in late summer and fall. Tennessee milkvetch is extremely rare in its range, and has been extirpated from northern Illinois and Indiana. With the information provided by research of this species, restoration of populations in suitable habitat is underway.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Alabama
Illinois
Indiana
Tennessee
State Range of  Astragalus tennesseensis
Habitat
  Dry gravel prairies in its northern range, calcareous barrens and cedar-glades in the southern part of its range with full sun to partial shade (Baskin & Baskin 1972)

Distribution
  Illinois, Indiana, Tennessee and Alabama (Baskin & Baskin 1972)

Number Left
  In 1988 there was only one extant population left in the area containing Illinois and Indiana. Currently there is an additional population in Indiana from a reintroduction project and seven counties in Illinois have populations due to similar efforts. The species is found in eight counties in Tennessee. There is no information on Alabama populations. (Webb et al. 1992)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G3
 
11/5/1984
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
RT
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Alabama S1S2 8/1/1996  
  Illinois SX 11/27/2002  
  Indiana SX SX 6/12/1984  
  Tennessee S3 E 4/1/2001  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  None known.

Threats
  Deer grazing
Insect larvae that kill adults in the spring
Extreme drought or wet seasons
(Webb et al 1992)

Current Research Summary
  Marlin Bowles and his colleagues at the Morton Arboretum have created a greenhouse population and are involved in reintroduction programs. Illinois DNR nursery manager, David Horvath and Carol and Jerry Baskin of the University of Kentucky have independently created propagation protocols from seed. (Native Plant Network 2002) The Illinois DNR has monitored the remaining natural population at Manito Prairie during the 1990's.

Current Management Summary
  None known.

Research Management Needs
  Continued reintroduction and protection of suitable habitat

Ex Situ Needs
 

References

Books (Single Authors)

Herkert, J.; Ebinger, J.E. 2002. Endangered and threatened species of Illinois: Status and distribution. Springfield, IL: Illinois Endangered Species Protection Board. 161p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

ILDNR. (2002). Plant species biology summaries. Illinois Department of Natural Resources, Division of Natural Heritage, Botany Program. http://dnr.state.il.us/conservation/naturalheritage/botany/botany.htm. Accessed: 2002.

NatureServe. (2008). NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. [Internet].Version 7.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. http://www.natureserve.org/explorer. Accessed: (June 17, 2008).

Journal Articles

Baskin, C.C.; Baskin, J.M.; Quarterman, E. 1972. Observations on the ecology of Astragalus tennesseensis. The American Midland Naturalist. 88: 167-172.

Baskin, C.C.; Baskin, J.M.; Quarterman, E. 1981. Effect of drought stress on transpiration rates and leaf areas of Astragalus-tennesseensis a near endemic to cedar glades. Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science. 56, 1: 27-31.

Baskin, C.C.; Quarterman, E. 1969. Germination requirements of seeds of Astragalus tennesseensis. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. 96: 315-321.

Baskin, J.M.; Baskin, C.C. 1981. A contribution to the ecological life cycle of Astragalus-tennesseensis. Journal of the Tennessee Academy of Science. 56, 1: 4-6.

Baskin, J.M.; Baskin, C.C. 1986. Distribution of geographical-evolutionary relationships of cedar glade endemics in southeastern USA. ASB Bulletin. 33, 4: 138-154.

Bowles, M.; Bachtell, K.R.; DeMauro, M.M.; Sykora, L.G.; Bautista, C.R. 1988. Propagation techniques used in establishing a greenhouse population of Astragalus tennesseensis Gray. Natural Areas Journal. 8: 122.

Caudle, C.F. 1968. Studies on the Life History and Hydro-Economy of Astragalus tennesseensis (Leguminosae). Dissertation Abstracts International. 29-07, Section B: 2313.

McFall, D.W. 1984. Vascular plants of the Manito Gravel Prairie Tazewell County Illinois USA. Transactions of the Illinois State Academy of Science. 77, 1-2: 9-14.

Schwegman, J.E. 1998. Some aspects of the life history and population dynamics of Astragalus tennesseensis A. Gray in Illinois. Castanea. 63, 1: 63-67.

Webb, D.H.; Baskin, J.M.; Baskin, C.C. 1992. Distribution and status of Astragalus tennesseensis (Fabaceae) in Alabama. Sida. 15: 97-103.

Theses

Wiltshire, B. 1994. Assessment of genetic diversity in Astragaleus tennesseensis and the federally endangered Dalea foliosa (Fabaceae). [M.S. Thesis]: Southern Illinois University. Carbondale, Illinois.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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