CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Agave schottii var. treleasei

Photographer:
Lynda Pritchett-Kozak

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Agave schottii var. treleasei


Family: 
Agavaceae  
Common Names: 
Trelease agave, Trelease shindagger
Author: 
(Toumey) Kearney & Peebles
Growth Habit: 
Subshrub, Shrub, Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
50

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Agave schottii var. treleaseienlarge
Photographer: Lynda Pritchett-Kozak


Agave schottii var. treleasei is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Kathleen C. Rice contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Agave schottii var. treleasei


Members of the Agave genus occur natively in arid and tropical regions from the southern USA to northern South America, and throughout the Caribbean (Benson and Darrow 1981, Gentry 1986). More than 200 species are recognized. The name Agave is derived from the Greek and means "noble," referring to their tall flower stalk. Some agave species have stalks that grow up to 40 feet tall. Agaves in general have many common and native local names including maguey, mescal, lechuguilla, amole and century plant.

Several species in the genus Agave are of global economic importance. Agave sisalana and Agave fourcroydes are widely cultivated in Africa, Asia, Mexico and Central America for fiber. The most important economic use of agaves is production of mescal and tequila. These products are worth millions of dollars to the Mexican economy. In Mexico, thousands of hectares are devoted to plantations of Agave tequilana, the source of tequila. Other species are grown world-wide as ornamentals (Desert Botanic Garden 2002)

Agave schotti v. treleasei is succulent rosette-forming perennial plant with leaves that are 25 to 40 cm long, 12 to 25 mm wide, linear, and deep green with no bud imprinting. Flowers appear from May to July. The flower stalk is 2 to 4 meters tall and 2.6 to 3.3 cm in diameter (Gentry 1986). It is subspicate to narrowly racemose-paniculate, the longer branchlets 27 to 40 mm long, the shorter ones 0.7 to 2.2 mm long (Benson and Darrow 1981, Gentry 1986). The deep yellow flowers are 35 to 50 mm long, usually 2 per cluster (Benson and Darrow 1981, Gentry 1986).



Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Arizona
State Range of  Agave schottii var. treleasei
Habitat
  This species occurs at elevations from 1100-2000 meters on sunny, open, gentle rocky slopes or in small drainages in high desert scrub, grassland and juniper and oak woodlands on gneiss substrate. (Desert Botanic Garden 2002).


Distribution
  Agave schottii var. treleasei is a narrow endemic found only in Pima and Cochise counties in southeastern Arizona. (Desert Botanic Garden 2002).


Number Left
  There is only a single occurrence of Agave schottii v. treleasei in habitat, located in the Santa Catalina Mountains (Phillips and Hodgeson 1991). This variety may be a polyploid of A. schottii v. schottii. Another possibility that is more likely is that plants here are hybrids between A. schottii. v. schottii and A. chrysantha or A. palmeri.
(see Notes)


Protection

Global Rank:  
G5T1Q
 
1/20/1999
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
SC
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Arizona S1 8/1/2002  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Like most species in the Agave genus, this species likely has its flowers pollinated by bats and/or hawk moths (Phillips and Comus 2000).


Threats
  The primary threat to Agave schottii v. treleasei is its inherent rarity (USFWS 1976).


Current Research Summary
  None known.


Current Management Summary
  Management focus is on avoiding direct impacts. The Santa Catalina site is located in the Pursch Ridge Wilderness Area, on U.S. Forest Service land (Phillips and Hodgson 1991).


Research Management Needs
  Taxonomic clarification is needed, and additional surveys are also needed. Chromosomal studies on plants from both sites (see notes) are needed, along with further electrophoretic work.


Monitoring Efforts
  Not Available


Ex Situ Needs
  Not Available


References

Books (Single Authors)

Benson, L.; Darrow, R.A. 1981. Trees and Shrubs of the Southwest Deserts. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press. 68p.

Gentry, H.S. 1982. Agaves of continental North America. Tucson, AZ: Univ. Arizona Press.

Kartesz, J.T. 1993. Species distribution data for vascular plants of 70 geographical areas, from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Kartesz, J.T. 1996. Species distribution data at state and province level for vascular plant taxa of the United States, Canada, and Greenland (accepted records), from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Kearney, T.H.; Peebles, R.H. 1973. Arizona flora. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. 1085p.

Phillips, S.J.; Comus, P.W. 2000. A Natural History of the Sonoran Desert. Tucson, AZ: Arizona-Sonoran Desert Museum Press.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

(2000). Center for Plant Conservation's National Living Collection--Profiles. Desert Botanical Garden. http://www.dbg.org/Collections/cpc.html. Accessed: 2002.

Arizona Game and Fish Department. (1999). Plant Abstracts. Compiled and edited by the Heritage Data Management System, Arizona Game and Fish Department, Phoenix, AZ. http://www.gf.state.az.us/frames/fishwild/hdms_site/Abstracts/Plants/abstracts%20-%20plants.htm. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Trame, A.M.; Coddington, A.J.; Paige, K.N. 1995. Field and Genetic-Studies Testing Optimal Outcrossing in Agave schottii, a Long-Lived Clonal Plant. Oecologia. 104, 1: 93-100.

USFWS. 1976. Proposed Endangered Status for 1700 U.S. Plants. Federal Register. 41: 24523-24572.

Reports

Fonseca, J.; Scalero, D. 1999. Determining Valuable Species within Pima County, AZ: a discussion paper for the Sonoran desert conservation plan. Tuscon, AZ: Pima County Flood Control District.

Phillips, A.M., III; Hodgson, W.C. 1991. Status Report. Phoenix, Arizona: Prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological services.


  This profile was updated on 4/29/2014
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