CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Viburnum bracteatum

Photographer:
Tom Ward

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Viburnum bracteatum


Family: 
Caprifoliaceae  
Common Names: 
bracted viburnum, limerock arrowwood
Author: 
Rehd.
Growth Habit: 
Shrub
CPC Number: 
4383

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Viburnum bracteatumenlarge
Photographer: Tom Ward
tomward[at]arnarb.harvard.edu


Viburnum bracteatum is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Irina Kadis contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Viburnum bracteatum


The name "arrowwood" belongs to a larger species, V. dentatum, that probably includes V. bracteatum. Indians used strong shoots of these viburnums for the shafts of their arrows. Bracted viburnum is a deciduous shrub up to 3 m tall that is different from other arrowwoods in its special habitat, late flowering time, leaf shape and texture, persistent conspicuous bracts (structures of leaf origin underneath the flower), and some other minute characters (Rheder 1904, Rheder 1940).

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Alabama
Georgia
Tennessee
State Range of  Viburnum bracteatum
Habitat
  V. bracteatum is part of the shrub understory in open deciduous woodland coating the calcareous bluffs, cliffs, and ledges along the Coosa River and on the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau (Foote and Jones 1994).

Distribution
  V. bracteatum historical range was northwestern Georgia to northwestern Alabama. It was known from the banks of the Coosa R. near Rome in Georgia and from the Appalachian Valley in Alabama (Small 1933).

Number Left
  Remaining numbers are unknown.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G1G2
 
3/20/2006
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
SC
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Alabama S1 8/1/1996  
  Georgia E 7/27/2002  
  Tennessee S1 E 4/3/2001  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Fruits are favored by many singing birds as well as game birds (wild turkeys, pheasants, etc.) and also by small animals (chipmunks and such).

Threats
  The main threat to this shrub is from quarrying of the dolomitic limestones. This has destroyed most of the type locality along the Coosa at the southern outskirts of Rome, GA, and has wiped out the Alabama locality known to Roland Harper (Kral 1983). Perpetuation of the species depends on the setting aside of some of the bluff country this shrub is known to frequent.

Current Research Summary
  None known.

Current Management Summary
  There is no formal management plan.

Research Management Needs
  Since there are many steep limestone bluffs along and near the Coosa River where the plants should be found, further search should be conducted and likely areas should be purchased and preserved (Kral 1983).

Ex Situ Needs
 

References

Books (Single Authors)

Dirr, M.A. 1998. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants. Champaign, Illinois: Stipes Publishing L. L. C.

Foote, L.E.; Jones, S.B., Jr. 1994. Native Shrubs and Woody Vines of the Southeast. Oregon: Timber Press.

Godfrey, R.K. 1988. Trees, shrubs, and woody vines of northern Florida and adjacent Georgia and Alabama. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press. 734p.

Jones, S.B., Jr.; Coile, N.C. 1988. The distribution of the vascular flora of Georgia. Athens, GA: University of Georgia. 230p.

Rehder, A. 1940. Manual of Cultivated Trees and Shrubs Hardy in North America. New York, NY: The Macmillan Co.

Small, J.K. 1933. Manual of the southeastern flora. New York, NY: Hafner Publishing Company. 1505p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Journal Articles

Rehder, A. 1904. List of New England Plants-XIV. Rhodora. 6: 59.

USFWS. 1976. Proposed Endangered Status for 1700 U.S. Plants. Federal Register. 41: 24523-24572.

Reports

Kral, R. 1983. A report on some rare, threatened, or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South, Technical Publication R8-TP2. Athens, GA.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service. p.1305.

Patrick, T.S.; Allison, J.R.; Krakow, G.A. 1995. Protected plants of Georgia: an information manual on plants designated by the State of Georgia as endangered, threatened, rare, or unusual. Social Circle, Georgia: Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division, Georgia Natural Heritage Program. p.218 pp + appendices.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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