CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Streptanthus bracteatus

Photographer:

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Streptanthus bracteatus


Family: 
Brassicaceae  
Common Name: 
bracted twistflower
Author: 
Gray
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
4137

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Streptanthus bracteatusenlarge
Image Owner: San Antonio Botanical Garden

Streptanthus bracteatusenlarge
Photographer: Jackie Poole
jackie.poole[at]tpwd.state.tx.us
Image Owner: Jackie Poole


Streptanthus bracteatus is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Cindy Barrett contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Streptanthus bracteatus


This beautiful plant is found in Texas Hill country. Once scattered throughout south-central Texas, this species is now thought to be rare, and has been considered for federal status.

The Bracted twistflower is an herbaceous, somewhat succulent waxy annual. It produces beautiful lavender-purple flowers from spring to early summer. Its name is derived from the fact that, located at the bottom of each flower stalk, is a tiny bract. This unique feature distinguishes the species from others in the genus. Indigeneous people and european settlers utilized related species as a food source. (Damude and Poole 1990).

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Texas
State Range of  Streptanthus bracteatus
Habitat
  Found in a number of varied habitats on thin clay soils in the semi-arid to mesic woodland habitat of the Balcones Canyonlands region of the Edwards Plateau. Proximity appears to be one of the few strict requirements for the species. Most of the known populations occur in Texas Hill Country. (Damude and Poole 1990)

Distribution
  Balcones Escarpment in the Edwards Plateau of south central Texas (Damude and Poole 1990)

Number Left
  Current population trends are unknown. In 1990 there were eight known sites containing 14 population clusters with 3 to over 500 plants per population. (Damude and Poole 1990)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G2
 
1/16/2002
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
SC
 
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Texas S2 9/5/1989  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Plants growing in open areas are eaten by deer and/or rabbits (Damude and Poole 1990).
It is likely that pollinators are required for successful reproduction. Only one species of bee (Magachile comata) has been observed on flowers that may be capable of pollinating this species. (Dieringer 1991)

Threats
  Deer browse
Residential development
Habitat alteration by fire suppression
(Damude and Poole 1990)

Current Research Summary
  David Benjamin Zippin, a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin, studied herbivory and the population biology of this species (Zippin 1997).

Current Management Summary
 

Research Management Needs
  Monitoring and surveys
Response to disturbance

Ex Situ Needs
 

References

Books (Single Authors)

Correll, D.S.; Johnston, M.C. 1970. Manual of the vascular plants of Texas. Renner: Texas Research Foundation. 1881p.

Enquist, M. 1987. Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country. Austin, Texas: Lone Star Botanical. 275p.

Rollins, R.C. 1993. The Cruciferae of continental North America: Systematics of the mustard family from the Arctic to Panama. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. 976p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Journal Articles

Dieringer, G. 1991. Pollination Ecology Of Streptanthus bracteatus (Brassicaceae) - A Rare Central Texas Endemic. Southwest Naturalist. 36, 3: 341-343.

Rodman, J.E.; Kruckeberg, A.R.; Al-Shebaz, I.A. 1981. Chemotaxonomic diversity and complexity in seed glucosinolates of Caulanthus and Streptanthus (Cruciferae). Systematic Botany. 6: 197-222.

Newspaper Articles

Bingamon, Brant. 2001 May 18. Three Canyons. The Austin Chronicle; 34, 36.

Reports

Damude, N.; Poole, J.M. 1990. Status report on Streptanthus bracteatus. Austin, Texas: Texas Natural Heritage Program. Endangered Resources Branch. Resource Protection Division. Texas Parks and Wildlfe Department.

McNeal, P. 1989. Status of Streptanthus bracteatus, Philadelphus ernestii and Amorpha roemerana in Travis County. Austin, Texas: Prepared for the Austin Regional Habitat Conservation Plan under contract to the Texas Natural Heritage Program, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Theses

Zippin, D.B. 1997. Herbivory And The Population Biology Of A Rare Annual Plant, The Bracted Twistflower (Streptanthus bracteatus) (Habitat Suitability). The University of Texas. Austin. 265p.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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