CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Mirabilis rotundifolia

Photographer:
Michelle DePrenger-Levin

Heading for profile page
CPC Home Join now
About CPC
CPC National Collection
Conservation Directory Resources
Invasive Plant Species Plant News
Plant Links Participating Institutions
Contribute
Search CPC
Search    Alphabetical List    Reference Finder    CPC Home


CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Mirabilis rotundifolia


Family: 
Nyctaginaceae  
Common Name: 
round-leaf four-o'clock
Author: 
(Greene) Standl.
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
2870

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


Profile Links
 ITIS
 Tropicos
 PLANTS
 Fish & WildLife

Mirabilis rotundifoliaenlarge
Photographer: Michelle DePrenger-Levin
Image Owner: Denver Botanic Gardens


Mirabilis rotundifolia is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Thomas Grant contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Mirabilis rotundifolia


The Arkansas River Valley of Colorado supports many unusual flora. Although some taxa are abundant several are narrowly restricted to the area of carbonate shales of the Niobrara Formation (Von Bargen 1997). Oxybaphus rotundifolius is one of the narrow endemics whose distribution is limited to this area. The brilliant purple, trumpet-like flowers appear in June, opening in the morning and usually closing by mid-day.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Colorado
State Range of  Mirabilis rotundifolia
Habitat
  Restricted to barren shale outcrops of the Smoky Hill Member of the Niobrara Formation in sparse shrublands or woodlands. Elev. 4800-5600 ft. (Spackman et al. 1997).

Distribution
  Colorado endemic. Fremont and Pueblo Cos., in the Arkansas River Valley between Pueblo and Canon City (Kelso et al. 1995).

Number Left
  Few known populations.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G2
 
5/31/2006
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Colorado S2 5/1/1999  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Ecological relationships are largely unknown, but this species is associated with Frankenia jamesii (Von Bargen 1997).

Threats
  Residential expansion and Development
Mining development (limestone for cement)

Current Research Summary
  Kelso's (1995) research on soil fractionation of different elements such as Ca, Mg, and K may explain the distribution of O. rotundifolius.

Denver Botanic Gardens has performed germination tests and currently grows the species in the Endangered species garden. Additionally, Denver Botanic Gardens has monitored populations on lands owned by the Portland Cement Company since 1995.

Current Management Summary
  Population monitoring by the Denver Botanic Gardens.

Research Management Needs
  A management plan needs to be designed and implemented. Research needs include understanding soil processes that may affect O. rotundifolius population dynamics. Aspects of this species reproductive biology and ecology would also be useful for conservation efforts.

Ex Situ Needs
  Seed collection and banking.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Kartesz, J.T. 1993. Species distribution data for vascular plants of 70 geographical areas, from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Kartesz, J.T. 1996. Species distribution data at state and province level for vascular plant taxa of the United States, Canada, and Greenland (accepted records), from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Spackman, S.; Jennings, B.; Coles, J.; Dawson, C.; Minton, M.; Kratz, A.; Spurrier, C.; Skadelandl, T. 1997. Colorado Rare Plant Field Guide. Fort Collins, CO: Prepared for the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program.

Von Bargen, E.; Coles, J.; Denham, M.; Jennings, W.; Martin, S.C.; Richards, V.; Steinkamp, M. 1997. Rare Plants of Colorado. Helena, Montana: Falcon Press. Prepared by the Colorado Native Plant Society.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Conference Proceedings

Kelso, S.; Heckmann, K.; Lawton, J.; Maentz, G. Endemic Calciphiles of the Middle Arkansas Valley, Colorado. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-283. Proceedings of the Southwestern Rare and Endangered Plant Conference; September 11-14; Flagstaff, AZ. In: Maschinski, J.; Hammond, H.D.; Holter, L., editors. 1996. USDA and US Forest Service. p 270-280.

Journal Articles

O'Kane, S.L. 1988. Colorado's rare flora. Great Basin Naturalist. 48, 4: 434-484.

Standley, P.C. 1909. The Allioniaceae of the United States with notes on Mexican species. Contributions from the U.S. National Herbarium. 12: 303-389.

Reports

Kelso, S.; Heckmann, K.; Lawton, J.; Maentz, G. 1995. The Ecology and Distribution of Oxybaphus rotundifolius and Penstemon versicolor: geobotany and endemism in the Arkansas Valley, Colorado. Colorado Natural Areas Program and Colorado Native Plant Society. p.30 + appendices.

Naumann, T. 1990. Status Report for Oxybaphus rotundifolius. Denver, CO: Colorado Department of Natural Resources. p.33.

Spackman, S.; Duff, M.; Floyd, S. 1996. Fourteeners Initiative rare plant survey report. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. unpublished.


  This profile was updated on 5/20/2011
California
Oregon
Washington
Idaho
Nevada
Arizona
Utah
Montana
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Oklahoma
Texas
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
Arkansas
Louisiana
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan
Michigan
Indiana
Ohio
Kentucky
Tennessee
Mississippi
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
South Carolina
North Carolina
Virginia
West Virginia
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
New Jersey
Connecticut
Rhode Island
Massachusetts
Vermont
New Hampshire
Maine
New York
New York
Hawaii
Hawaii
Hawaii
Hawaii