CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Lesquerella parviflora

Photographer:
Carol Dawson

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Lesquerella parviflora


Family: 
Brassicaceae  
Common Names: 
frosty bladderpod, piceance bladderpod
Author: 
Rollins
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
2511

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Lesquerella parvifloraenlarge
Photographer: Carol Dawson
Carol_Dawson[at]blm.gov
Image Owner: Denver Botanic Gardens


Lesquerella parviflora is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Michelle DePrenger-Levin contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Lesquerella parviflora


In June and early July, Piceance Bladderpod produces golden-yellowish flowers off of decumbent stems from low growing rosettes. This bladderpod is covered with star-shaped hairs which gives it a silvery appearance. It is these specialized leaf hairs that separate this species from other closely related species. Plants can be found on a nearly barren slope of weathering oil shale. (Colorado Native Plant Society 1997)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Colorado
State Range of  Lesquerella parviflora
Habitat
  This species is found on shale outcrops of the Green River Formation, on ledges and slopes of canyons in open areas. Elev. 6200-8600 ft. (Von Bargen 1997)

Piceance Bladderpod is frequently found with Pinus edulis, Juniperus osteosperma, Eriogonum sp., Cirsium sp., Astragalus lutosus, Cercocarpus sp., Galium coloradense, Oryzopsis hymenoides, Penstemon sp., and Machaeranthera sp. (NatureServe 2001).

Distribution
  This species is endemic to the shale barrens of northwestern Colorado. Piceance Basin in Garfield, Mesa and Rio Blanco Cos. (Von Bargen 1997).

Number Left
  There are 31 populations in the shale barrens of northwestern Colorado. (NatureServe 2001).

Protection

Global Rank:  
G2
 
5/19/2008
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
RT
 
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Colorado S2 1 2/7/1991  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  None known.

Threats
  Threats include off-road vehicle disturbance, grazing disturbances, and urban development (Anderson 1988).

Current Research Summary
  None known.

Current Management Summary
  There is no formal management plan.

Research Management Needs
  Research into all aspects of this species life history and ecology would be useful.

Ex Situ Needs
  Seed collection and storage.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Kartesz, J.T. 1993. Species distribution data for vascular plants of 70 geographical areas, from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Kartesz, J.T. 1996. Species distribution data at state and province level for vascular plant taxa of the United States, Canada, and Greenland (accepted records), from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Rollins, R.C. 1993. The Cruciferae of continental North America: Systematics of the mustard family from the Arctic to Panama. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. 976p.

Spackman, S.; Jennings, B.; Coles, J.; Dawson, C.; Minton, M.; Kratz, A.; Spurrier, C.; Skadelandl, T. 1997. Colorado Rare Plant Field Guide. Fort Collins, CO: Prepared for the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program.

Von Bargen, E.; Coles, J.; Denham, M.; Jennings, W.; Martin, S.C.; Richards, V.; Steinkamp, M. 1997. Rare Plants of Colorado. Helena, Montana: Falcon Press. Prepared by the Colorado Native Plant Society.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

CNAP. (2002). from South Cathedral Bluffs Natural Area. Colorado Natural Areas Program. http://parks.state.co.us/cnap/Natural_Areas/NA%20pages/socathedral.htm. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Naumann, T. 1988. Jewels of the Desert--Colorado's Barren Land Plants. The Green Thumb. 45: 8-15.

O'Kane, S.L. 1988. Colorado's rare flora. Great Basin Naturalist. 48, 4: 434-484.

Newspaper Articles

1996 May 19, 1996. Pod protector: Farmer makes it his business to protect plant. Joplin Globe;

Reports

Anderson, J. 1988. Status Report for Lesquerella pruinosa. Prepared for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Peterson, S.J. 1982. Threatened and endangered plants of Colorado. Denver, CO: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. p.35.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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