CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Hudsonia montana

Photographer:
E. LaVerne Smith

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Hudsonia montana


Family: 
Cistaceae  
Common Name: 
mountain golden-heather
Author: 
Nutt.
Growth Habit: 
Subshrub, Shrub
CPC Number: 
2280

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Hudsonia montanaenlarge
Photographer: E. LaVerne Smith
Image Owner: fr. Smithsonian


Hudsonia montana is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 

 
Hudsonia montana


The golden heather represents a wonderful case of an endangered species where threats to its very existence became tools to help save it. There are very few of these plants left and hikers and rock-climbers passing through the species' habitat were damaging many of the remaining populations. Not only did the local government of Burke County give its support behind conserving this species but also a local rock-climbing group offered to help publicize the need to protect the plants in their newsletter in the hope that this would reduce the risk of trampling by rock-climbers in the area (USFWS 1980c). An additional aid in protecting this heather is that the remaining populations are all on public land within the Pisgah National Forest where they can be protected now that the species has been listed as federally endangered (USFWS 1980b)

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  North Carolina
State Range of  Hudsonia montana
Habitat
  Shallow soils that form over quartzite or mica gneiss rock ledges, it is usually in the sparsely vegetated ecotone between bare rock and heath bald. (NatureServe Explorer 2002)

Distribution
  Burke and McDowell Counties in western North Carolina

Number Left
  34 plants at Table Rock, Burke County, NC unknown number of plants at Chimneys, Burke County, NC unknown number of plants at Chimney Gap, Burke County, NC unknown number of plants at Shortoff Mountain, Burke County, NC 20 plants at Woods Mountain, McDowell County, NC 4 plants at Singecat Ridge, McDowell County, NC
There are seven known populations, five of them are along the rim of a single Blue Ridge Escarpment gorge, and they contain a total of 2,000 to 2500 individuals. (Nature Serve Explorer 2002, paper in file dated 2/91)

Protection

Global Rank:  
G1
 
9/24/2008
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
LT
 
10/24/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
Yes
 
9/14/1983

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  North Carolina S1 E 1/1/2001  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Unknown.

Threats
  Fire suppression
Trampling by hikers and rock-climbers
(Nature Serve Explorer 2002)

Current Research Summary
  Gross et al. (1998) have researched ways to reduce the threats to this species while developing management protocols for it.

Current Management Summary
  Critical habitat was established in Burk Co., NC at the time of listing (F.R. 1980)
Paths have been rerouted to avoid fragmenting populations and to keep foot traffic away from the plants (2/91 paper)

Research Management Needs
  Monitoring of the remaining populations to determine the population status at each site and to learn more about the natural history of this species and how potential threats may impact various life history stages. (F.R. 1980)
Shrub removal from habitat (F.R. 1980)

Ex Situ Needs
 

References

Electronic Sources

(2002). NC-ES Plant profiles. [Web pages] North Carolina Ecological Services--U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services--Southeast Region 4. http://nc-es.fws.gov/plant/plant.html. Accessed: 2002.

USFWS. (1990). Endangered and Threatened Species Accounts. [Web page] U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Endangered Species. http://ecos.fws.gov/servlet/TESSSpeciesQuery. Accessed: 2002.

USGS. (2002). Status of Listed Species and Recovery Plan Development. [Web site] USGS: Norther Prairie Wildlife Research Center. http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/distr/others/recoprog/plant.htm. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Gross, K.; Lockwood, J.R.; Frost, C.C.; Morris, M.F. 1998. Modeling controlled burning and trampling reduction for conservation of Hudsonia montana. Conservation Biology. 12, 6: 1291-1301.

Jones, M.P. 1980. Hudsonia Protection Fostered by Local Cooperation. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 5, 11: 2-3.

USFWS. 1980. Determination of Hudsonia montana (mountain golden-heather) to be a threatened species with critical habitat. Federal Register. 45, 204: 69360-69363.

USFWS. 1980. Proposal to determine Hudsonia montana (mountain golden-heather) to be a threatened species and to determine its critical habitat. Federal Register. 45, 105: 36332-36335.

USFWS. 1980. Threatened Status, Critical Habitat Proposed for Mountain Golden-Heather. Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. 5, 6: 15.

Magazine Articles

Anonymous. 1987. Mountain golden-heather discovered outside of Linville Gorge. North Carolina Natural Heritage Program Newsletter: 8.

Morse, L.E. 1988. Rare Plants of Appalacian Bedrock. The Nature Conservancy Magazine: 38.

Reports

Morse, L.E. 1979. Report on the conservation status of Hudsonia montana, a candidate endangered species. Bronx, NY: New York Botanical Garden, Cooperative Parks Study Unit. p.37.

Murdock, N.; Frost, C.C. 1991. Mountain Golden Heather, Hudsonia montana Nuttall. Asheville, NC and Raleigh, NC: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and North Carolina Plant Program. p.4.

USFWS. 1983. Mountain Golden Heather (Hudsonia montana) Recovery Plan. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. p.26.

Theses

Morse, Larry Eugene. 1979. Systematics and ecological biogeography of the genus Hudsonia (Cistaceae), the sand heathers. [Ph.D. Thesis]: Harvard University. Cambridge, MA. 281p.

Stevenson, Robert Eugene. 1971. Temperature acclimatization in the black-billed magpie (Pica pica hudsonia, Sabine). [Ph.D. Thesis]: Montana State University. Bozeman, MT. 33p.

Todd, Kenneth S. 1964. Helminth parasites of the Black-billed Magpie (Pica pica hudsonia Sabine) in Gallatin County, Montana. [M.S. Thesis]: Montana State University. Bozeman, MT. 31p.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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