CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Helianthus niveus ssp. tephrodes

Photographer:
Lynda Pritchett-Kozak

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Helianthus niveus ssp. tephrodes


Family: 
Asteraceae  
Common Name: 
desert sunflower
Author: 
(Gray) Heiser
Growth Habit: 
Subshrub, Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
2200

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Helianthus niveus ssp. tephrodesenlarge
Photographer: Lynda Pritchett-Kozak


Helianthus niveus ssp. tephrodes is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Kathleen C. Rice contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Helianthus niveus ssp. tephrodes


This beautiful sunflower grows in Dune ecosystems of California. Plants are perennials form long tap roots and can grow up to one meter in height. The leaves are all opposite or nearly alternate, and spathulate, with white, or grayish sericeous hairs appressed on the surfaces. The flower heads are solitary, with the corollas from reddish purple to nearly yellow.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Arizona
California
State Range of  Helianthus niveus ssp. tephrodes
Habitat
  Plants are limited to the loose sand dunes of Baja, California, which extend north into southern Arizona and northern California. Associated species include Eriogonum deserticola, Palofoxia arida, Tiquilia plicata, Ephedra trifurca, Oenothera deltoides and Pholisma sonorae.

Distribution
  California

Number Left
  There are four sites documented within U.S. boundaries.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G4T2
 
5/14/2001
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
SC
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Arizona S2 8/1/2002  
  California S1.2 1  
  Mexico *FR83 8/26/1988  
  Sonora 8/28/1991  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Ecological relationships are unknown.

Threats
  Threats include off-road vehicle use, and development of dunes for agriculture, roads and housing.

Current Research Summary
  Germination (Chandler and Jan 1985), chromosome differences (Chandler 1986) and variation in sunflower species has been studied (Heiser 1954, 1955, 1957).

Current Management Summary
  Populations are monitored at Algodones Dunes in California (Bureau of Land Management 2000).

Research Management Needs
  Management needs include focusing on enforcing laws regarding illegal off-road vehicular use and initiate planning strategies that allow for plant conservation. Research needs include understanding abiotic/biotic influences on population dynamics.

Ex Situ Needs
  Additional seed collections are needed.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Heiser, C.B. 1969. The North American sunflowers (Helianthus). Durham, N.D.: Published for the Club by the Seeman Printery. 218p.

Kartesz, J.T. 1993. Species distribution data for vascular plants of 70 geographical areas, from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Kartesz, J.T. 1996. Species distribution data at state and province level for vascular plant taxa of the United States, Canada, and Greenland (accepted records), from unpublished data files at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Skinner, M.W.; Pavlik, B.M. 1997. Inventory of rare and endangered vascular plants of California: Electronic Inventory Update of 1994, 5th edition. Sacramento: California Native Plant Society.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

(2000). Center for Plant Conservation's National Living Collection--Profiles. Desert Botanical Garden. http://www.dbg.org/Collections/cpc.html. Accessed: 2002.

CDFG. (2002). California's Plants and Animals, Threatened and Endangered Plants. List and Species Accounts. California Department of Fish and Game, Habitat Conservation Planning Branch. http://www.dfg.ca.gov/hcpb/species/t_e_spp/teplant/teplanta.shtml. Accessed: 2002.

Dice, J.C.; Sebasta, D. (1999). Rare and endangered plants of the Algodones Dunes. Outdoor California: March-April 1999. http://www.glamisonline.org/piersons_milkvetch/plantarticle.htm. Accessed: 2002.

Journal Articles

Anaschenko, A. 1974. On the taxonomy of the genus Helianthus L. Bot. Zhurn. 59: 1472-1481.

Beckstromsternberg, S.M.; Rieseberg, L.H.; Doan, K. 1991. Gene Lineage Analysis in Populations of Helianthus niveus and H. petiolaris (Asteraceae). Plant Systematics and Evolution. 175, 3-4: 125-138.

Bowers, J. E. 1996. Seedling emergence on Sonoran Desert dunes. Journal of Arid Environments. 33, 1: 63-72.

Chandler, J.M. 1986. Chromosomal Differentiation among the Annual Helianthus Species. Systematic Botany. 11, 2: 354-371.

Chandler, J.M.; Jan, C.C. 1985. Comparison of Germination Techniques for Wild Helianthus Seeds. Crop Science. 25: 356-358.

Heiser, C.B. 1954. Variation and subspeciation in the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus. American Midland Naturalist. 51: 387-405.

Heiser, C.B. 1955. Morphological and cytological variation in Helianthus petiolaris with notes on related species. Evolution. 15: 247-258.

Heiser, C.B. 1957. A revision of the South American species of Helianthus. Brittonia. 8: 283-295.

Kunze A.; Aregullin, M; Rodriguez, E.; Proksch, P. 1996. Fate of the chromene encecalin in the interaction of Encelia farinosa and its specialized herbivore Trirhabda geminata. Journal of Chemical Ecology. 22, 3: 491-498.

Nabhan, G. 1989. Rescuing Arizona's Endangered Plants. Arizona Highways. 65: 35-41.

Siguenza, C.; Espejel, I.; Allen, E.B. 1996. Seasonality of mycorrhizae in coastal sand dunes of Baja California. Mycorrhiza. 6, 2: 151-157.

Watanabe, K.; Ohno, N.; Mabry, T.J. 1986. Three sesquiterpene lactones from Helianthus niveus subsp. canescens and H. argophyllus. Phytochemistry. 25, 1: 141-3.

Whittemore, A.; Gershenzon, J.; Mabry, T.J. 1985. Sesquiterpene lactones from Helianthus niveus subsp. niveus. Phytochemistry. 24, 4: 783-5.

Reports

BLM. 2000. Monitoring of Special Status Plants in the Algodones Dunes, Imperial County, California (Results of 1998 Monitoring and Comparison with the Data from WESTECĂs 1977 Monitoring Study). Sacramento, CA: Bureau of Land Management, California State Office. p.39.

BLM. 2001. Monitoring of Special Status Plants in the Algodones Dunes, Imperial County, California (1977, 1998, 1999, and 2000). Sacramento, CA: Bureau of Land Management, California State Office. p.65.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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