CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Coreopsis latifolia

Photographer:
Robert Sutter

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Coreopsis latifolia


Family: 
Asteraceae  
Common Name: 
broad-leaved tickseed
Author: 
Michx.
Growth Habit: 
Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
1068

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Coreopsis latifoliaenlarge
Photographer: Robert Sutter
rsutter[at]tnc.org
Image Owner: North Carolina Natural Heritage Program


Coreopsis latifolia is Not Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 

 
Coreopsis latifolia


Broad-leaved tickseed is a slender, erect, perennial herb that grows in rich sandy-loams of the Blue Ridge Mountains. It is found in and around the Black Mountains and along the Blue Ridge Escarpment from the Craggies to the South Carolina line with disjunct populations in Tennessee (Sutter 1989). The plant often grows to 1.5 meters in length and is essentially glabrous with long rhizomes. The inflorescence is a small corymb with yellow ray and disk flowers (Radford 1968). From August to September, yellow flowers develop that will produce 10-15 seeds per head. Many of this specie's populations now appear stable (Sutter 1989).

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Georgia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
State Range of  Coreopsis latifolia
Habitat
  Rich moist woods, along mountain streams, light gaps, and roadsides in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (Sutter 1989).

Distribution
  Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee (Sutter 1989).

Number Left
  34 populations exist (Sutter 1989).

Protection

Global Rank:  
G3
 
1/26/2003
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
RT
 
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Georgia S1 7/13/1995  
  North Carolina S3 C 8/17/1990  
  South Carolina S1 D 1/24/1991  
  Tennessee S1 E 8/11/1986  
  Tennessee Valley Authority S?  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Flowers from August-September, produces fruit from September-October. It outcrosses but is also self-compatible (Sutter 1989).

Threats
  Habitat alteration
Agriculture
Some silvicultural practices
Roadside maintenance and widening
(Sutter 1989)

Current Research Summary
  None

Current Management Summary
  Many populations are large and extensive and appear stable and many are situated on public land afforded some protection.

Research Management Needs
  Demography and monitoring of extant populations and searching for new populations.
General biology and pollination ecology research.

Ex Situ Needs
  Seed collection from all populations not represented in collection.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Massey, J.R.; Otte, D.K.S.; Atkinson, T.A.; Whetstone, R.D. 1983. An Atlas and Illustrated Guide to the Threatened and Endangered Vascular Plants of the Mountains of North Carolina and Virginia. Asheville, NC: Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 218p.

Radford, A.E.; Ahles, H.E.; Bell, C.R. 1968. Manual of the vascular flora of the Carolinas. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press. 1183p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

NatureServe. (2008). NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. [Internet].Version 7.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. http://www.natureserve.org/explorer. Accessed: (June 17, 2008).

Journal Articles

Crawford, D.J.; Post, B.J.; Whitkus, R. 1988. Allozyme variation within and between populations of Coreopsis latifolia (Asteraceae). Plant Species Biology. 3: 1-5.

Smith, E.B. 1976. A biosystematic survey of Coreopsis in eastern United States and Canada. Sida. 6: 123-215.

Reports

1995. 1995 Annual report on taxa in the national collection for North Carolina Botanical Garden. Annual report to the Center for Plant Conservation. p.1.

Sutter, R.D. 1989. Coreopsis latifolia. North Carolina Plant Conservation Program Report. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Theses

Post, Barbara J. 1986. The species biology of Coreopsis latifolia. [M.S.]: University of North Carolina at Charlotte. 84p.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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