CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Conradina grandiflora

Photographer:
Jon Shaw

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Conradina grandiflora


Family: 
Lamiaceae  
Common Name: 
large-flowered rosemary
Author: 
Small
Growth Habit: 
Shrub
CPC Number: 
1039

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Conradina grandifloraenlarge
Photographer: Jon Shaw

Conradina grandifloraenlarge
Image Owner: Bok Tower Gardens


Conradina grandiflora is Fully Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Dorothy M. Brazis contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Conradina grandiflora


This pungently, essentially evergreen, aromatic shrub is in the mint family. There are 5 species in this genus that are found in the southeastern United States, and all but 1 are considered rare or endemic. This particular species, Conradina grandiflora, is particularly memorable because, as its name indicates, C. grandiflora has the largest flowers in its genus. These flowers appear year-round, and are a vibrant blue with blue spots, and two-lipped. Its leaves are needle-like, opposite, dark-green with small black dots, and white underneath because of a dense covering of fine hair. Fruit are rounded, smooth, blackish nutlets.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Florida
State Range of  Conradina grandiflora
Habitat
  This species is always found on deep, fine sandy soils, often on or in the vicinity of ancient dunes of shores. (Kral 1983b)

Associates are typically Pinus clausa, Lyonia, Ilex, various evergreen scrub oaks, Ceratiola, Polygonella and Opuntia. (Kral 1983b)

Distribution
  C. grandiflora occurs in eastern peninsular Florida, in Brevard, Broward, Dade (possibly extirpated), Highlands, Indian River, martin, Osceola, Palm Beach, St. Lucie, and Volucia Counties. (Kral 1983b)

Number Left
  There are 64 element occurrences with 14 found within managed areas (NatureServe 2000). C. grandiflora is not uncommon where scrub persists (NatureServe 2000).

Protection

Global Rank:  
G3
 
11/3/1997
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
SC
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Florida S3 LE 4/12/1990  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  The ecology of C. grandiflora has not been studied.

Threats
  The main threat to this species is the dramatic decline in scrub habitat on Atlantic Coastal Ridge, as the species is not uncommon where scrub persists. This habitat is threatened by habitat conversion to housing, commercial development or citriculture.

Current Research Summary
  No known research is being conducted on this species.

Current Management Summary
  No active management is known to be in progress

Research Management Needs
  Conduct research to determine life history, ecology, and basic biology.

Ex Situ Needs
  Continue to maintain conservation collections.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Coile, N.C. 2000. Notes on Florida's Regulated Plant Index (Rule 5B-40), Botany Contribution 38. Gainesville, Florida: Florida Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry.

Nelson, G. 1996. The Shrubs and Woody Vines of Florida. Pineapple Press, Incorporated. 464p.

Small, J.K. 1933. Manual of the southeastern flora. New York, NY: Hafner Publishing Company. 1505p.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Electronic Sources

(2002). Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants. [Web site] University of South Florida Institute for Systematic Botany. http://www.plantatlas.usf.edu/isb/default.htm. Accessed: 2008.

Denton, S. (2001). Photo Library of Native and Naturalized Plants of Florida. Biological Research Associates. http://www.biolresearch.com/Plants/index.php?id=C. Accessed: 2002.

NatureServe. (2008). NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. [Internet].Version 7.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. http://www.natureserve.org/explorer. Accessed: (June 17, 2008).

Journal Articles

Abrahamson, W.G. 1984. Species response to fire on the Florida Lake Wales Ridge. American Journal of Botany. 71, 1: 35-43.

Race, T.. Etonia Rosemary (Conradina etonia). The Bok Tower Gardens Newsletter.

Shinners, L.H. 1962. Synopsis of Conradina (Labiatae). Sida. 1, 2: 84-88.

Shinners, L.H. 1962. Vegetative Key to Woody Labiatae of the Southeasatern Coastal Plain. Sida. 1, 2: 92-93.

Reports

Crook, R.W. 1996. Conradina: Interspecific and Intergeneric Relationships. Tallahassee, Florida: Florida Division of Forestry: Statewide Endangered and Threatened Plant Conservation Program.

Kral, R. 1983. A report on some rare, threatened or endangered forest related vascular plants of the south. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Forest Service. p.718. USFS technical publication R8-TP2, . Vol. 1.

Kral, R. 1983. A report on some rare, threatened, or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South. Athens, GA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service. p.1305. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service Technical.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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