CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Clematis viticaulis

Photographer:
John Wurdack

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CPC National Collection Plant Profile

Clematis viticaulis


Family: 
Ranunculaceae  
Common Name: 
Millboro leatherflower
Author: 
Steele
Growth Habit: 
Subshrub, Forb/herb
CPC Number: 
1005

Distribution
Protection
Conservation
References


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Clematis viticaulisenlarge
Photographer: John Wurdack
Image Owner: fr. Smithsonian


Clematis viticaulis is Partially Sponsored
Primary custodian for this plant in the CPC National Collection of Endangered Plants is: 
Irina Kadis contributed to this Plant Profile.

 
Clematis viticaulis


Clematis viticaulis is an herbaceous perennial in the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). Branches are laden with leathery green, deciduous leaves. These leaves overtop the central axis, a way to differentiate this species from a closely related species (Keener 1967). Greenish flowers on long peduncles bloom from April to June then give way to dark purplish-brown fruits from June to September.

Distribution & Occurrence

State Range
  Virginia
State Range of  Clematis viticaulis
Habitat
  C. viticaulis can be found on shale barrens (Gleason 1952, Gray's Manual 1987)

Distribution
  C. viticaulis is known from Bath County in Virginia (Gleason 1952).

Number Left
  Remaining population size and any additional sites is unknown.

Protection

Global Rank:  
G2
 
6/17/1999
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:  
SC
 
1/19/1996
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:  
No
 

State/Area Protection
  State/Area Rank Status Date  
  Virginia S2 3/1/2001  

Conservation, Ecology & Research

Ecological Relationships
  Ecological relationships are unknown.

Threats
  Urban development
Road construction, right-of-way maintenance
Farm field clearing
Human trampling
In places where habitats are still available, populations are vandalized and robbed by irresponsible amateur gardeners and nurserymen who dig out plants
Overtopping by arboreal species or fast growing herbs; invasive species.


Current Research Summary
  Other than propagation, extensive research has not been conducted.

Current Management Summary
  There is no formalized management plan.

Research Management Needs
  Management needs include population identification and monitoring so that this species can be protected. Research needs include identifying habitat requirements and understanding general ecology.

Ex Situ Needs
  Propagation by softwood cuttings: taken in mid-June, treated with 2,500-5,000 ppm. K-IBA and kept under fog/mist during the initial rooting period yield 60%+ rooting. Even when well rooted, they are slow to grow back in spring. Potting young plants once the are rooted might be the preferred treatment, rather than letting the cuttings overwinter in their flat.

Propagation from seed: seed cold-stratified for 2 to 3 months germinate @ 40-50%.

References

Books (Single Authors)

Anonymous. 1986. List- Based Record. Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A.

Gleason, H.A. 1952. The New Britton and Brown illustrated flora of the northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. New York, NY: Hafner Press. 1732p.

Gleason, H.A.; Cronquist, A. 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada. Bronx: The New York Botanical Garden.

Books (Sections)

Kartesz, J.T. 1999. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the U.S., Canada, and Greenland. In: Kartesz, J.T.; Meacham, C.A., editors. Synthesis of the North American Flora, Version 1.0. North Carolina Botanical Garden. Chapel Hill, NC.

Journal Articles

Keener, C.S. 1967. A biosystemic study of Clematis subsection Integrifoliae (Ranunculaceae). J. Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 83, 1: 19-38.

Steele, E.S. 1911. Contributions from the U. S. National Herbarium. 13: 364.

Weber, W.A. 1982. Phytologia. 51, 6: 374.

Reports

Kral, R. 1983. A report on some rare, threatened, or endangered forest-related vascular plants of the South, Technical Publication R8-TP2. Athens, GA.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service. p.1305.


  This profile was updated on 3/4/2010
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